Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page




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* 2011 Gourmand World Cookbook Award Winner -
Named "Best in the World" in its category

* 2011 Gourmand Wine Book Award Winner - USA

* 2012 Nautilus Silver Book Award Winner:
Food / Cooking / Healthy Eating

* 2012 James Beard Book Award Finalist:
Reference & Scholarship



* 2012 IACP Book Award Finalist:
Wine, Beer, or Spirits

Named the "#1 Wine Book of the Year" as chosen by 195 'Best Of' lists (including those of the Chicago Tribune, LA Weekly, Minneapolis Star Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, Vancouver Sun and Wall Street Journal) compiled by EatYourBooks.com

Named The Best Wine Book of the Year by
Jenn Garbee of LA WEEKLY

Named My Favorite Wine Book This Year by
Bill Ward of the
Minneapolis Star Tribune

Named The Best Wine Book of the Year Yet by wine blogger
Tom Wark of Fermentation: The Daily Wine Blog

Named #2 on a list of the 12 best food and wine books of the year by
Anthony Gismondi and Kasey Wilson of CFUN Radio

Named one of three top wine books of the year by
Anthony Gismondi of the Vancouver Sun

Named one of three wine books that top the holiday gift list by
William M. Dowd of the Albany Times Union

Named one of four of the best wine books of 2011 by
Bill St. John of the Chicago Tribune

Named one of four great new wine books of 2011 by
Michael Austin of the Chicago Sun-Times

Named one of the five best wine books of the year by wine columnist Lettie Teague of The Wall Street Journal

Named one of nine favorite food books for holiday gifts by
Amanda Gold
of the San Francisco Chronicle

Named one of 10 great reads for wine and cookbook lovers by
Shelley Boettcher of Wine Access

Named one of 10 favorites of the past year by
Genevieve Ko of Good Housekeeping

Named one of the 11 Best Food Books of 2011 by
Carey Polis of The Huffington Post

Named one of 15 of the Best Cooksbooks in '11 by
The Philadelphia Inquirer

Named one of our [16] favorites of 2011 by
Foodista

THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE

by Karen Page with Andrew Dornenburg
Photography by Tom Kirkman

(Hachette Book Group / Little, Brown; November 2011)

From the front flap:

Praised by Publishers Weekly as the "incisive, hip writing team" behind some of the culinary world's best-loved books, internationally acclaimed authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg bring their hallmark style to the mission of opening the world of wine to food lovers.

After seventeen consecutive years of growth, the United States has just become the world's number-one consumer of wine. However, the single largest segment of American wine drinkers categorize themselves as "overwhelmed" by the vast array of choices offered in wine stores, on supermarket shelves, and on restaurant wine lists. In writing THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, the authors set out to simplify the subject using the fresh perspective that if you love food, you know flavor and you can master wine.

This groundbreaking guide celebrates wine as an all-American beverage that's a key part of our country's history and culture, and provides an encyclopedic A-to-Z reference profiling more than 250 different wines by grape, region, weight, aintensity, flavors, food pairings, notable producers and more. Laced throughout are sidebars on finding wines you'll love based on the foods you love, plus insider tips like "Ten Secrets for Getting More Pleasure from Wine" and "150+ Wines Under $15."

In THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, you'll be guided by dozens of one-time aspiring chefs, urban planners and rock stars who, through twists of fate, followed their passion for wine and became some of America's best sommeliers at such restaurants as Blue Hill, CityZen, Daniel, Eleven Madison Park, the French Laundry, the Inn at Little Washington, Le Bernardin, Manresa, No. 9 Park, Per Se, and Spago. They share in these pages their insider recommendations, including go-to wines for tough food-pairing challenges as well as favorite wine regions that yield the best values.

(Journalists can request a review copy of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE from book publicist Carolyn O'Keefe at Little, Brown here.)

"Every once in a while, a really, really good wine book comes along…something destined to become a classic...Amazingly fresh and novel...Brilliantly presented... The perfect book for someone who is just starting out in wine and the perfect book for those who have studied wine for so long that they seldom wander off the path of the tried and true...Highly recommended."
Wine columnist Lisa Airey, CWE, Baltimore Sun

"Extraordinary."
Award-winning author Rose Levy Beranbaum

"Fantastic...One of the best wine gifts of the year."
Shelley Boettcher, Wine Access

"An indispensable reference...
Every food lover should have this book in his or her kitchen."
Michele Borboa, MS, SheKnows.com

"The best book of wine knowledge and learning I have ever come across."
Stephen L. Brauns, IndulgeInDenver.com

"An epic resource book for wine and food lovers."
Christopher J. Davies, Vino Tasting

"This book is the 'cheat sheet' that can make you appear as if you’ve studied wine for years...Startlingly comprehensive."
Baroness Sheri de Borchgrave, Cottages & Gardens

"What I'm reading: the latest from two of my favorite authors,
THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE
. Outstanding."

Tim Ferriss, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The 4-Hour Workweek and The 4-Hour Body

"Authoritative yet approachable...Playful."
Fine Cooking

"Invaluable, even for people with loads of wine experience."
Jameson Fink, Foodista

"It's the best wine book I've seen that is specifically geared to foodies...I love that it offers layers of information so I can I get more out of it as my wine knowledge increases."
Beth Fish Reads

"Fantastic...And their pairing suggestions and matches are, bar none,
the best out there
."
Alison Fryer, The Cookbook Store - Toronto

"May be their best book yet."
Huffington Post columnist Rozanne Gold

"Seems destined to medals equal in number to what Soviet Army generals wore."
New York Times wine writer Howard Goldberg

"Truly the perfect place for an aspiring wine lover to get started and gain confidence."
Caron Golden, San Diego Foodstuff

"[An] amazing book, richly studded with the passionate musings of sommeliers, exhaustingly encyclopedic."
Gael Greene

"We love the book...It might be the best manual for understanding wine and your own personal flavor profile."
Chef Jamie Gwen, KFWB Radio

"Comprehensive guide to selecting and enjoying the right wines, which makes it easy to impress your connoisseur friends without having to study for a sommelier license."
Ellen Huet, SF Weekly

"A sure-to-be classic."
Philip Kampe, The Wine Hub

"It’s empowering, eminently browsable and just plain fun."
Sharon Kapnick, Oxford Companion to Food and Drink contributor

"A brilliant book."
Michele Locke, Vinecdote

"A favorite pick of mine...Will be appreciated by both those newer to wine and those who have been drinking Bordeaux for 30 years."
Bella McDowell, WineAndGoodFood.com

"Just as thorough and informative as [THE FLAVOR BIBLE]...This essential guide includes a clearly organized list of flavor profiles for more than 250 grapes; a fascinating timeline of the history of wine in America; and valuable tips dispensed by the country’s best sommeliers."
Anna Mowry, James Beard Foundation blog

"Masterful and boundlessly useful....A must-have for novices, connoisseurs, and restaurant professionals."
Award-winning wine author Mark Oldman

"Should satisfy the intellectual palate of any wine lover in your life."
Liz Palmer, METROACTIVE

"I LOVE this book!"
Culinary historian and host Linda Pelaccio, "A Taste of History"

"I have raved upside down and backwards about the books that Karen and Andrew crank out, and this one joins their ranks...It deserves as much praise as I gave their masterpiece, THE FLAVOR BIBLE."
Katie Pizzuto, GonzoGastronomy.com

"Offers smart, well-informed advice and guidance about wine to people who care about fine cuisine but don't know as much about drinking as they do about eating."
Carey Polis, The Huffington Post

"Incredibly insightful and cutting-edge...In a league all its own as far as wine books are concerned."
Sommelier Inez Ribustello, Inez Says

"Should become a standard reference for both wine beginners and avid connoisseurs, packed as it is with so much useful advice and insider tips."
David Lincoln Ross, The Daily Beast

"A smart, practical book that should be in every wine geek's library...Fascinating."
Anne Schamberg, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

"Remarkably down to earth, and often fun."
Lettie Teague, The Wall Street Journal

"An essential addition to every wine lover's library."
Marguerite Thomas, Wine Review Online

"A worthy followup to their fabulous WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT...Packed with practical and clever advice."
Bill Ward, Minneapolis Star Tribune

"The best wine book I'd laid my eyes on in a very long time...I don't know how to recommend THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE highly enough."
 
Tom Wark, Fermentation

Purchase Online:

THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE

"Gift-giving for wine lovers is usually difficult. The wine lover, like the anything lover, almost always knows more about the object of adoration than the giver, so the risk of an underappreciated gift is high...But if your situation is a little more open-ended, choose a book instead. Books last longer than bottles, they stoke the imagination, and the good ones offer multiple points of entry. Even if you know little about wine, you know your friend, and by leafing through a book, you can get a pretty good idea of whether she'll like it. That's harder to do looking at a wine label or even tasting a wine...Wine does not exist in a vacuum, but is integral to history, the arts, politics and ethics. The books I mention below emphasize these interrelationships, but each will connect most immediately with a frame of mind aligned at least somewhat with the spirit that gave it life. For this reason, I preface each title with a hypothetical personality of the gift recipient who would most appreciate it. For The Gourmand, who loves to cook and eat and wants to understand more about the true variety of wines available to exalt his dining experiences: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg ($35) is a true education....[Features] sections on tasting and serving basics, quotations from thoughtful wine-world people, a comprehensive list of varietals with intelligent categories such as 'volume' and 'weight' as well as 'acidity' and 'flavors,' and reliable producers. A lot of good advice on food and wine pairing follows."
Joe Appel, "Appel on Wine," The Portland Press Herald (December 14, 2011)

"Four fine wine books, and a big beer chaser: There is no better way to learn about beer or wine than to drink it. We can agree on that. But a little supplemental reading never hurts, either, especially if you’ve had your fill for the day, or the week, and there are no knowledge-spewing experts — bartenders, sommeliers, shopkeepers — within earshot. Learning-by-doing rules the night in beer and wine education, but straight-up facts, figures and anecdotes can help you place those tastes within the bigger picture. On top of that, now is the time of the buying of the gifts. Maybe the gifts are for someone else, or maybe they’re for you. Nobody will judge you for buying yourself a book at this time of year or any other. Keep drinking and start reading. Here are five great new books for you and your people: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little Brown, $35) by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg comes at the idea of pairing wine with food from several different angles. The authors’ expertise stands side-by-side with tips from dozens of other wine experts on topics such as picking alternate wines based on what you already know you like, thinking like a sommelier and thinking of wine as a very American drink — not some esoteric finery from a foreign land. The easily digestible lessons are joined by at-a-glance profiles of more than 250 wines (characterizing a wine style’s color, weight, acidity, flavors, food pairings and notable producers, among many other things). The book also offers a list of 150 budget wines for $15 or less."
Mike Austin, "The Pour Man," Chicago Sun-Times (December 13, 2011)

"Three Extraordinary Wine Books: If you are one of those people who is secretly thinking: 'why spend money on a book about wine when I could spend it on a good bottle of it instead' you are not alone. In THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg quote Paul Bertolli and Alice Waters of Chez Panisse as saying essentially the same thing: 'It is not necessary to know about wine to appreciate it; what there is to know, beyond the glamour of vintage, producer, and varietal, is in the glass in front of your nose.' Karen and Andrew write that they 'agree wholeheartedly' but '...add a corollary: you can enhance your appreciation of a wine with more knowledge of it.'...My dear friends Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg live a charmed life. As husband and wife, and coauthors, they get to eat, drink, travel, and work together. In fact, I've never seen one without the other! I first met Andrew when he was a chef at East Coast Grill in Cambridge, MA. Karen is a brilliant researcher and writer. Their collaboration makes for an enviably unbeatable team, which has produced several award-winning books. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is the most recent of them! It's a beautifully organized four color production, detailed with useful information, and fascinating quotes from sommeliers offering their opinions from the classics to discussions of the major importers of different categories of wine. I love the chart on page 270 'Holy Grail Food and Wine Pairings,' which should be laminated and hung in every kitchen. (On a personal note, I would add my favorite pairing pesto and sauvignon blanc. Karen and Andrew do list asparagus and Sauvignon Blanc which is the same concept of grassiness enhancing grassiness for difficult to pair ingredients. I also discovered the perfect harmony of lobster and Scheurebe which they do recommend with shellfish in another section of the book where they include two of my favorite producers Cloudy Bay and St. Supéry.)"
Award-winning author Rose Levy Beranbaum, Real Baking with Rose (November 26, 2011)

FLAWLESS CROWNS

"THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is an encyclopedic A-to-Z guide profiling hundreds of different wines by their essential characteristics from body and intensity to distinguishing flavors, from suggested serving temperatures and ideal food pairings to recommended producers (including many iconic examples). Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg wrote this hardcover with great detail. I am able to thumb through the pages and learn about wines by the grape, region, and more. Each wine is profiled distinctly making this book indispensable for any lover of the grape."
Martin Berrios, Flawless Crowns (November 11, 2011)

"The dynamic duo. I'm Anthony Dias Blue with today's Blue Lifestyle Minute. Food and wine make a perfect complementary pair to enhance flavors and create an unbeatable atmosphere, but with the wrong pairings, a potentially great meal can easily become a calamity. If you heed THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, written by bestsellers Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, this type of crisis will never befall you. Written in the language of flavor, this new book combines expertise with history in order to bridge the gap between culinary mastery and wine specialty. Although there can be hundreds of choices in the supermarket or wine shop, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE will give you straightforward, accessible and wallet-friendly suggestions that will keep you from feeling overwhelmed. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Little Brown, is available in stores and online for $35. Info and more at bluelifestyle.com. I'm Anthony Dias Blue."
Anthony Dias Blue, "Blue Lifestyle Minute," KABC Radio (Los Angeles) and WCBS Radio (New York) (December 5, 2011)

"The Wine Access 2011 Holiday Gift Guide: Gifts for wine lovers and foodies, plus stocking stuffers and the best cookbooks and wine books: It's that time of year, once again. Whether you're celebrating Christmas, Hanukkah or just want to give the wine lover in your life something special, we've picked out the best gifts of the year. Our holiday gift guide is divided into four sections — wine lovers, foodies, stocking stuffers and cookbooks and wine books. Enjoy! THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. These two award-winning authors have created a fantastic source for anyone wishing to pair wine and food — and really, isn’t that most of us? The book features more than 200 types of wine profiled by grape, sustainable wine choices, glassware tips, plus advice for wine lovers of all levels; from the award-winning authors of THE FLAVOR BIBLE. (Little, Brown and Company, $35)."
Shelley Boettcher, WineAccess.ca (December 2011)

"The Best Cookbooks for Gourmet Gift Lists: The vast (and vastly delicious) selection of beautifully-illustrated, recipe-packed cookbooks available at bookstores and online gives you near endless holiday gifts for your favorite foodies. The following cookbooks not only caught our attention but also made our mouths water. We recommend putting them at the top of your gourmet gift list....A wine book unlike any other, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown, and Company, November 2011) by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg isn't a cookbook per se, but it is certainly an indispensable reference for food lovers who want to find the perfect vino for their meals. Formatted like the authors' two previous bestsellers, THE FLAVOR BIBLE and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, this food and wine pairing book is an encyclopedic A-to-Z guide profiling hundreds of different wines by their essential characteristics from body and intensity to distinguishing flavors, and from suggested serving temperatures and ideal food pairings to recommended producers (including many iconic examples). As a bonus, the book provides illuminating insights from dozens of America's best sommeliers via informative sidebars, charts and boxes, which complement the book's gorgeous four-color photography. Every food lover should have this book in his or her kitchen."
Michele Borboa, MS, SheKnows.com (November 30, 2011)

INDULGE IN DENVER

"THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE...is the best book of wine knowledge and learning I have ever come aross. The authors have put together a very user-friendly, easy-to-read and undertandable book that anyone can enjoy and learn a great deal from...Indulge in Denver highly recommends this book for anyone who derives pleasure from a nice glass of wine."
Stephen L. Brauns, IndulgeInDenver.com (February/March 2012)

Frantic Foodie

"FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is an indispensable reference, formatted like the authors’ two previous bestsellers THE FLAVOR BIBLE and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, an encyclopedic A-to-Z guide profiling hundreds of different wines by their essential characteristics-from body and intensity to distinguishing flavors, from suggested serving temperatures and ideal food pairings to recommended producers (including many iconic examples). Here you can learn all you need to know about wine."
—Keren Brown, FranticFoodie.com (January 5, 2012)

"Book Review: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Little, Brown and Co., $35, 352 pages). In a nutshell: Landmark authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (CULINARY ARTISTRY, THE FLAVOR BIBLE) continue their exploration of flavor profiles, turning to the sometimes overwhelming world of wine. The guide — it's not a traditional cookbook — breaks down 250 types of wine based on what they taste like, eschewing 'wine geek' terminology and including lots of charts designed to demystify wine for everyday drinkers. Take a taste: Charts include how to pick a wine based on what you're eating (shiraz or zinfandel for barbecue, or sauvignon blanc for gazpacho, for instance), as well as what wines people might like based on what they like to eat (bacon lovers, Côte-Rotie is for you!). And if you're in a wine rut, it has suggestions for other wines you might like based on what you usually drink (instead of pinot noir, try barbera, grenache, Brunello di Montalcino, Burgundy or Chinon). What's hot: Don't just take their word for it — they've assembled a panel of more than 30 wine experts, including some of the best sommeliers and wine masters, for in-depth insiders tips on reading wine lists, discovering new wine types, and wine protocol."
Grant Butler, The Oregonian (December 19, 2011)

"Many thanks for your wonderful book and for including us in it. Our 25th American Harvest Workshop was such great fun and very special!"
Dolores & Jack Cakebread, Cakebread Cellars (November 23, 2011)

"Great #book (I'm in it too!): THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO #WINE (9780316045131): Karen Page, Andrew Dornenburg."
Craig Camp, WineCampBlog.com via Twitter (February 17, 2012)

"THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE on NXNW: Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page have written another winning book about wine. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE has been voted the best wine guide of 2011. They were recent guests in the NXNW Cooking Club...Karen emphasized that it doesn't have to be complicated. 'If you love food you understand flavour, and you can understand wine. Because wine is just one more layer of flavour in terms of enjoying a meal,' she said, adding that the right wine with the right food can be 'heaven.' They also want to encourage people to sample different varietals, not just the commonplace Chardonnays and Cabernets. 'There's a lot of exciting new flavours to explore,' Karen said. When it comes to sampling something new, Andrew suggested that if you go to a restaurant, you should tell the sommelier what you usually like to drink at home, and identify the price point you want. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE includes user-friendly charts that compare the flavours in food to the same ones in wine. 'People get so intimidated about wine,' Karen explained. 'They think they have to have the right language. They think they need to use fancy terms, and that's not the case at all. If you like cherries, you'll love an Oregon Pinot Noir. If you love peaches, you're going to love trying Viognier.'"
CBC.ca Books
(January 20, 2012)

"Since we’re such foodie nerds over here at Cheeky, we are beyond excited for James Beard Award-winning authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg’s newest literary creation. The authors behind The Flavor Bible, Becoming a Chef, Culinary Artistry, Dining Out, Chef’s Night Out, The New American Chef and What to Drink with What You Eat will be signing copies of their new book THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE at the Union League Club tonight at 5:30pm."
CheekyChicago.com (November 9, 2011)

yumsugar

"Check Out the Top Contenders for Best Cookbook of the Year: Thousands of cookbooks were published in the last year, but which ones are really worth buying? The International Association of Culinary Professionals, or IACP, tackled the question as it announced its cookbook award finalists for 2012 today...Cookbook winners will be announced on April 2 in an award ceremony hosted by Mo Rocca, where the honor of best cookbook of 2012 will also be announced. To see the entire list of award winners...Wine, Beer or Spirits: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg."
Susannah Chen, YumSugar.com (February 17, 2012)

"Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg’s newest book, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, brings wine closer to home. The book opens with a timeline of the key wine events in American history. This really makes us realize that wine is neither foreign nor new to this country. It puts things into perspective to know that one of the aims for Jamestown was to establish a wine industry so that England no longer had to rely on France and Spain for its wine needs. The book is filled with interviews with top American sommeliers on their wine views and tips. Their voices and priceless stories from working “the floor” and dealing with guests face-to-face add unique personality to the book and captivate the reader. For example, star soms like John Ragan of Eleven Madison Park, Sabato Sagaria of The Little Nell and Claire Paparazzo of Blue Hill tell how they entice clients to try new grapes and how most people’s palates evolve as they become more serious drinkers. Readers will learn to build their wine palates around taste profiles: the flavors they like in food translate to taste profiles in wine. Chapter 4, “Know Your Wines: The Lists,” features information about specific grapes such as Grignolino and wine styles such as Meritage Red. The authors also break down wine pairing with food. I especially liked their take on soup: “The idea of pairing a beverage with a liquid may seem redundant or odd — but wine can provide an important contrast or complement to soup. It can be used to cut the richness…or to enhance it…” Bringing it back home, I love the sommelier’s recommended reference section. These are tried-and-true books, magazines and websites that industry professionals are endorsing and using. Can it get any closer?"
Cynthia Sin-Yi Cheng, FindYourCraving.com (December 6, 2011)

BostonZest

"...THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE arrived a few days later and hasn't made it to a bookshelf yet. It has spent a few nights beside the bed as Penny's relaxation reading, we've used it explore a couple of new wines, and we're planning to feature some recommended producers as our Sparkler of the Month. Learn in various ways from a collection of great wine lovers: If you were hanging outside our door, you might have heard us reading quotes from the book to one another. It has the greatest collection of quotes from wine lovers and wine experts you can imagine. Boston's own Cat Silirie is often cited. Ed loves the pronunciation guide in the core listing of wines, grapes, and wine topics. The system used to emphasize the importance of wine grapes, characteristics, and producers (by using bold and all caps in lists) is brillant and intuitive to use. The end chapters on matching wines with foods, cuisines, and courses will have us exploring new options. We love the gold boxes with great asides on topics. A few are already marked with page tabs.  Since these writers believe that the wine you like is the right wine for you, they've prepared a series of recommendations based on your own taste. If you like a flavor, for example almonds, they give you a list of wines to try. If you like a particular wine, they give you others with similar flavor profiles...We are not only recommending this book to our readers, we'll be buying copies as gifts for wine-loving friends. It is a treasure and we expect it to look a bit worn and well-used pretty quickly. It may even suffer a few wine stains but we doubt that Karen and Andrew will mind."
—Penny & Ed Cherubino, BostonZest.com (April 10, 2012)

"The two most anticipated reference books are THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Little, Brown) and The Oxford Companion to Beer (Oxford Common Press)."
—Edouard Cointreau, Paris Cookbook Fair newsletter (September 2011)

"Reading through @KarenAndAndrew's THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE good stuff! Love the different points of view from different somms."
—Doug Cook, Able Grape, via Twitter @ablegrape (November 22, 2011)

"New Books: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page with Andrew Dornenburg. We always love anything from Page and Dornenburg, (FLAVOR BIBLE, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT) as we learn so much but don't feel preached to and they present the information in such an easy, usable format. The dynamic duo understand food and wine are not mutually exclusive and those who love food may not have the same knowledge about wine. Hence the book. Great gift. Hardcover, 336 pp. $39.00."
The Cookbook Store in Toronto (December 2011)

"THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is not so much about wine, insist authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. It’s a book about flavor, they say, and the goal of this new book (Little, Brown and Co., $35) is to help readers use each wine's special flavor to enhance food and the dining experience.  The couple, shown above, list more than 250 wines, telling you everything from how to pronounce their names to what grapes are used to where the wine is made to top producers and food pairings. Most important, Page and Dornenburg invite you to use the book to change your perceptions about wine. Quite useful is their list of Wine Myths vs. Reality....Thirsty for more? Page and Dornenburg will talk about THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE during a wine and appetizer reception and book signing at the Union League Club of Chicago from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, 65 W. Jackson Blvd. Reception tickets are $40 for the general public, available by calling The Book Stall at Chestnut Court in Winnetka at 847-446-8880. Union League members can register through the club."
Bill Daley, The Chicago Tribune (November 7, 2011)

"Must Read: VinoTasting Holiday 2011 Gift Guide: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. Rating: Excellent. Lesson #1; Wine Is Food! Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg have created an epic resource book for wine and food lovers. Their experience and knowledge of food, wine and the wine industry has enabled them to create this valuable guide. Thumbing through the book you will find many useful sections on wine serving, varietals, pairing suggestions, what sommeliers know, elevating the wine experience and continuing your wine exploration. This book is oozing with information. It will be come an invaluable resource for anyone looking to expand his or her knowledge of wine and food. Once you open it, it will be hard to put down!"
Christopher J. Davies, VinoTasting.com (December 18, 2011)

"There’s been a nonstop flow of winemakers coming to Manhattan to show off their new vintages; among them are Carmenere from Chile, Barbaresco from Italy and Zweigelt from Austria. So many choices can be confusing—as well as intimidating. The solution: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg). THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is a user-friendly wine reference that decodes 250 different wines, providing the most essential information (pronunciation, grape variety, flavor, texture, food pairings, etc.). It’s the perfect wine course that cuts to the chase and leaves out all those tedious details (like soil analysis, oak treatment and vintage weather reports). This book is the 'cheat sheet' that can make you appear as if you’ve studied wine for years. In a startlingly comprehensive, yet easy-to-read, glossary demystifying every grape variety, under Carmenere (kar-men-AIR), for example, you’ll learn that this Chilean grape is dark red in color; has medium to high tannins; has a fruity flavor balanced by savoriness and can express notes of black cherries, currants, black pepper, chocolate, earth, game and violets; the texture is rich, silky, smooth and soft; and it pairs best with barbecue, lamb, pork ribs. 'We agree with Julia Child and Alice Waters that one of the greatest things about wine is that it makes food taste even better,' said two-time James Beard Award-winners, Karen and Andrew, a married couple who finish each other’s sentences and switch plates and wine glasses at each course at restaurants. Their previous book, THE FLAVOR BIBLE, was a phenomenal success (selling 140,000 copies in hardcover) as a key reference source for chefs, telling them what foods/ingredients work together. I predict this book will be equally well-received because, as they point out, the United States is now the world’s leading consumer of wine (as of this year) and people want to make educated choices. And besides, who can resist anything that has 'lover’s guide' in the title?"
Baroness Sheri de Borchgrave, Cottages & Gardens (November 15, 2011)

Decant This! ... the wine blog of Bill Ward

"Two great reads: Dornenburg and Page's pairing books: It used to be one of those rote tropes that writers favor, the kind that start with 'If you can have only one book about pairing food and beverages …' And the rest of the story was … Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page’s WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. Now there are some dandy food-wine matchmaking works: Evan Goldstein’s Perfect Pairings, Karen MacNeil’s Wine, Food & Friends and Andrea Immer Robinson’s Everyday Dining With Wine. But Dorenburg and Page covered pretty much all beverages, mainly focusing on those with some alcohol. Well now they’ve done it again. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is an eminently fitting followup to WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, somehow expanding on something that already seemed complete. The focus this time is on wine, and thoroughly so. The authors look at scores of grapes and make recommendations not only for dishes but for wine brands. The book, like its predecessor, is layered with tons of tidbits, charts and sidebars featuring statistics and advice from other experts. And again like WHAT TO DRINK, it’s remarkably practical; a reader of any expertise level on food or wine will never feel intimidated nor 'talked down to.' It doesn’t just make you feel like an insider; it makes you an insider. Both these books are meant for the kitchen, of course, but also are well-suited for the bedroom or bathroom, because you can pick them up, turn randomly to any section, and dive right in. Deciding which of these is more deserving of the title 'indispensable' is almost impossible. I can’t imagine doing without either."

Decant This! (January 24, 2012)

"Wines for Your Thanksgiving Spread: If you’re on a last-minute hunt for Thanksgiving wines, consider one of these recommendations from two-time James Beard Award-winning authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, co-authors of the new THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown), which was recently named one of the five best wine books of the year by the Wall Street Journal. Whether you’re looking for a multi-sipper that goes with everything you’ve heaped on your plate or for a variety of bottles to pair with all of the trimmings, this list has you covered..."
"Delights & Prejudices," The Official James Beard Foundation Blog at blog.jamesbeard.org (November 22, 2011)

"New wine books top the holiday gift list: I've been trying to climb out from under a deluge of wine-centric books released in time for the holiday gift-giving frenzy. It's an annual effort, and takes a little time away from shilling my own non-wine book now on sale. (Glad you asked. It's Barrels & Drams: The History of Whisk(e)y in Jiggers and Shots.) Nevertheless, I've made the sacrifice to cull a trio of good books to top the list. Herewith, my capsulized views of each: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page with Andrew Dornenburg. Little, Brown & Co. Hardcover. $35. Sommelier interviews, encyclopedic listings of grapes and their many twisted vines of heritage, a history of key periods in wine, trivia and tried-and-true wines ... all this and a lot more goes into this latest effort by the writing team of Page and Dornenburg.
This is not the sort of book you'll curl up with in front of the fireplace, a nice Cab in hand. It is, however, a very useful book, something not always a property of a Christmas gift. If you want to look at tried-and-true food and wine pairings, or check out a bit of wine trivia, then pop the book back on the shelf until the next time you absolutely have to find something in a hurry, this is THE book to have."
William M. Dowd, longtime spirits and wine judge / journalist, "Dowd on Drinks" in the Albany Times Union and Dowd's Wine Notebook (December 2, 2011)

drinks

"Simplifying the Subject: In writing THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, internationally acclaimed authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg set out to simplify the subject, using the fresh perspective that if you love food, you know flavor and you can master wine. This guide celebrates wine as an all-American beverage that is a key part of our country's history and culture. It provides an A-to-Z reference profiling more than 250 different wines by grape, region, weight, intensity, flavors, food pairings, notable producers, and more. Laced throughout are sidebars that tell you how to find wines you'll love based on the foods you love, plus insider tips like '10 Secrets for Getting More Pleasure from Wine' and '150 Wines Under $15.'"
Drinks
magazine (Fall 2011)


Steve Beckta, Karen Page, Andrew Dornenburg

"I’m naturally drawn to sensible folk like New Yorkers Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg who visited Ottawa earlier this week to launch their latest (and, likely, soon-to-be ridiculously successful) gastronomic tome titled THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. They appeared Monday at Play Food & Wine, and the next day at a private dinner at Beckta Dining & Wine, invited here by long-time friend and Ottawa restaurateur Stephen Beckta. It was Karen and Andrew who introduced Stephen to the Manhattan haute cuisine scene in 1999 before he made quite a name for himself as an acclaimed sommelier in the Big Apple. Karen and Andrew have picked up their share of coveted James Beard awards for previous books, among them CULINARY ARTISTRY that is still revered by chefs. Their latest about wine is nominated for a James Beard Award too...."
Ron Eade, Ottawa Citizen (April 14, 2012)

"Best Cookbooks of 2011: We amalgamated 195 'Best Cookbooks of 2011' lists from TV, Radio, Newspapers, Magazines, Websites, Blogs and Booksellers across the world (there are links to all of them below) to come up with the definitive guide to the best books on food and drink...The #1 wine book of the year as chosen by 'best of' lists is THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by @KarenAndAndrew."
EatYourBooks.com and @EatYourBooks (December 21, 2011)

"Karen Page & Andrew Dornenburg, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE at Book Larder. While food and wine link beautifully at the table, few books bring the two together in their pages. The authors of the bestselling FLAVOR BIBLE change that with their latest work, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. Karen and Andrew will visit on December 1st to talk about how they think about pairing food and wine, and to help sort through the sometimes daunting wine choices a food lover faces, whether dining out or at home. And of course they'll sign copies of their marvelous book."
EdibleSeattle.com (December 1, 2011)

"They're at it again. Authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg keep building these wonderful bridges and then helping us cross them....[This time] with THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, they capture the universality of the wine experience....They are two of my all-time favorite guests...and two of the greatest teachers I know."
— Jennifer English, "Bottoms Up," KFNX Radio in Phoenix (February 17, 2012)

"A Guide to Benefits: Beaujolais nouveau is about to make its annual debut. A number of French restaurants will stay open late Wednesday to celebrate and to pour the wine (officially starting at one minute past midnight)...On Thursday, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., there will be another party with the wines and food from Alison 18, Alison Price Becker’s restaurant that is opening soon: $65. The admission includes a copy of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, and part of the proceeds will be donated to a scholarship fund run by Les Dames d’Escoffier for women seeking careers in the restaurant industry: brownpapertickets.com/event/209529."
Florence Fabricant, The New York Times (November 15, 2011)



"If you love to have a glass of wine with your food but you're not sure how to put the flavors all together, don't worry: Our next guests have figured it all out for you. They are the authors of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE; it is an award-winning book that was named 'The Best Wine Book of 2011' based on [a compilation of] 195 year-end 'Best Of' lists. Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, welcome to the show. We're so happy that you're here."
Derick Fage and Lois Lee, "Daytime" on Rogers TV (April 9, 2012)

"What I'm reading: the latest from two of my favorite authors, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. Outstanding."
Tim Ferriss, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The 4-Hour Workweek and The 4-Hour Body, via Twitter @TFerriss (November 14, 2011)

"Books That Cook: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. In this sequel to their award-winning WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, husband and wife team Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg invite readers to join them on another friendly journey into the world of wine and food. In an A-to-Z format, their book profiles hundreds of wines, focusing for the most part on flavor and how the wines pair with food. Their premise — that food lovers know flavor and therefore have the chops to understand, discover, and choose great wines to go with their meals — allows the authors to leave behind confusing wine statistics, vintages, critical wine scores, and tongue-tying wine classifications. Instead, they enliven their wine story-telling by going straight to the country’s foremost sommeliers for food and wine pairing guidance. The book’s chatty armchair tone is authoritative yet approachable, and sidebars such as Understanding a Wine’s Personality, which assigns personas to wines, are playful entry points to understanding how wine fits into a meal."
Fine Cooking
magazine (Dec 11 / Jan 12 issue)


"Any book that uses xylophones and crayon boxes to illustrate and explain the principles of wine is already a winner, and it's emblematic of the spirit of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. Written by Karen Page with Andrew Dornenburg, it is a book that will welcome, engage, and enlighten a broad spectrum of wine lovers, from the novice to the expert....They give every person credit for already knowing what flavors they like based on a lifetime of eating. You like almonds? Try fino sherry. What's fino sherry? Flip to the excellent chapter, 'Know Your Wines: The List" for a user-friendly guide from A for 'Acidic Wines' to Z for 'Zweigelt.' Grapes, regions, and styles of wine are covered in this resource that is invaluable, even for people with loads of wine experience....Along with a nice bottle, you can add THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE to the holiday list of anybody who wants to learn more about wine. You'll gain confidence, and take on your future wine adventures with aplomb. And I won't be surprised if xylophones and crayon boxes become the hottest wine accessories."
Jameson Fink, Foodista.com (December 9, 2011)

BETH FISH READS

"I am so excited to introduce you to THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE because it is just the type of book my husband and I have been looking for. We own several wine books and most are one of two types: lists of wines with ratings or a detailed explanation of wine regions, history, and vineyards. Nothing ever seemed useful for two people who enjoy a glass of wine with dinner and want to know more about what they're drinking and what to buy. I knew I was in the right place from the very first page, the very first line: 'Drink wine. With food. Not too much.' Yes, the nod to Michael Pollan is absolutely intentional and sums up Page and Dornenburg's own philosophy. Their wine book is a no-nonsense, easy to understand, and informative guide to figuring out which wines to buy or order to fit our own tastes and the food we plan to eat....There is so much more to this book than I can write here. I have four pages of notes and a ton of sticky flags marking pages. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is a book that I'll use and read over and over again. It's the best wine book I've seen that is specifically geared to foodies, and I love that it offers layers of information so I can I get more out of it as my wine knowledge increases. Cheers!"
Beth Fish Reads (December 3, 2011)

Foie Girl

"Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, co-authors of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, among many other books are just about the greatest couple I know. Super smart, incredibly knowledgeable and just all around what my Dad would call 'good people.' I got their take on pairing wines with persnickety Easter and Passover foods for CookingDistrict.com."
FoieGirl.com (April 3, 2012)

"The International Association of Culinary Professionals has announced the 2012 IACP Award Finalists, all of which are listed below...Winners will be announced in New York on April 2; here are all the finalists...Wine, Beer, or Spirits:
· Bitters: A Spirited History of a Classic Cure-All, with Cocktails, Recipes Author: Brad Thomas Parsons; Editor: Emily Timberlake; Publisher: Ten Speed Press
· Mastering Wine for the Asian Palate Author: Jennie Cho Lee; Publisher: Asset Publishing and Research, GrapeXpectations Asia LTD Hong Kong
· THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE Authors: Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg; Editor: Michael Sand; Publisher: Little, Brown & Co."
Paula Forbes, Eater.com (February 16, 2012)

"THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. This is Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg's latest contribution to the world of wine. A must-have resource book for wine lovers. This excellent book references 250 wines from around the world, many wines we'd never even heard of or had a hard time finding out about....An invaluable resource."
— Dean and Lisa Foster, wine columnists, Pottstown (PA) Mercury (February 21, 2012)

"The Wine Press: Gewgaws for the Wine Geek: ...My best advice is to avoid the whole mess altogether and buy something other than wine. Books are great gifts: I heartily recommend Gerald Asher’s A Vineyard in My Glass (University of California Press, $25.95). Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg’s FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown, $35), Daring Pairings by Evan Goldstein (UC Press, $35), or Tom Stevenson’s indispensible fifth edition of The Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia (Dorling Kindersley, $50) also rise to the top of my list."
Doug Frost, MS/MW, wine columnist, Kansas City Star (December 20, 2011)

"Best Wine Book Of The Year: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. Not because Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg co-authored it, though that would be reason enough. But because their latest book is good. Very good. And it's organized like their books CULINARY ARTISTRY and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT classics for every thoughtful cookbook shelf. Like those books, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is arranged logically and simply. It's also remarkably Twitter-friendly in its concise wine descriptions considering the couple first began writing in their signature reference-type style more than fifteen years ago. In their latest book, you'll find plenty of meaty Cabernet commentaries, but also a history of American winemaking in timeline form that includes pivotal moments....The encyclopedic-like listings that make up the bulk of the book are organized by grape but also by type of wine and region...Plenty of sommelier interviews and pairing suggestions follow. Think of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE as a wine fridge reference book that doubles as fodder for your next Friday night game of Trivial Pursuit. The winner gets a bottle from Charles Krug, Napa Valley's oldest commercial winery (1861). And yes, we'd be delighted to join you."
Jenn Garbee, LA Weekly (December 2, 2011)

"From two-time James Beard Award-winning culinary authorities Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg comes the latest addition to their collection of acclaimed food reference books, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. Preceded by THE FLAVOR BIBLE and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE aims to bridge the gap between two of life's most celebrated pleasures in a super accessible manner. Page and Dornenburg say they 'love food first and wine second,' thus their book is essentially an insight into wine from a food lover's perspective. To this end, tips on how to maximize the enjoyment of wine are presented in a language familiar to foodies. Those intimidated by obscure-sounding tasting notes will take comfort in the book's assertion that taste is subjective, and that identifying a wine's characteristics by familiar food flavors is perfectly acceptable...Though you might be tempted to photocopy a few pages to sneak into the restaurant to assist in making your wine selection, the information in the rest of the book is presented sensibly enough that it imparts memorable general principles to be used as guidelines. Far from reading like a typical reference manual, the playful tone and inclusion of ample color photographs makes it an enjoyable, easy read. Cheers to that!"
Gayot.com (February 17, 2012)

"Wine Know-How for Foodies: Looking for a good new book on wine? THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by two-time James Beard Award-winning culinary authorities Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg aims to bridge the gap between two of life's most celebrated pleasures in a super accessible manner..."
Gayot Quarterly Wine Newsletter (Spring 2012)

"Here's a great holiday gift idea: A bottle of Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Nouveau and a copy of Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg's new book, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, just named one of the top five wine books of the year by the Wall Street Journal. Page and Dornenburg's WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT was recipient of the 2006 Georges Duboeuf Wine Book of the Year."
Georges Duboeuf, via Facebook.com/Georges Duboeuf (November 29, 2011)

"If you are looking for last-minute wine gifts, here are my top three recommendations of the year: Authentic Wine: Toward Natural and Sustainable Winemaking by Jamie Goode and Sam Harrop, (University of California Press, $30). THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Little Brown, $35) is an excellent dose of common sense that questions whether or not the original food and wine rules are worth noting. Naked Wine: Letting Grapes Do What Comes Naturally by Alice Feiring (De Capo Press $24) more on the future of wine."
Anthony Gismondi, Vancouver Sun (December 16, 2011)

"THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg is a great new book....Wonderful....It placed second on our list of the top 12 food and wine books of the year, behind Modernist Cuisine....We love this book."
—Anthony Gismondi and Kasey Wilson on the Best of Food & Wine Show on CFUN 1410 in Vancouver (December 22, 2011)

"A Cookbook for Everyone On Your Gift List: Whoever said the book market is dead hasn't seen the floor of our newsroom. In the past several months, the Food & Wine department has been deluged with food-themed books on every subject one more enticing than the next...There's something for everyone in this stack. Here is a selection of favorites, good choices for holiday gifts: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE: There are plenty of food and wine pairing books on the market, but when Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg who wrote THE FLAVOR BIBLE and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT chime in, we know it's going to be an informational read. Here, the flavor experts provide an A-to-Z listing of different wines, with pairing notes and tips."
Amanda Gold, San Francisco Chronicle (December 2, 2011)

"According to USA Today last week, the purchase of wine has gone up 14% this year and, for the first time, people are buying more wine than wine glasses! Good news: Smart public and better wine glasses. Another sociological shift is that people are buying more '"experiences' (self-care, self-improvement) and products with more 'prestige.' That's a perfect fit for wine...It's also good news for the authors of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown and Company), written by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. Just named one of the five best wine books of the year by the Wall Street Journal, the book addresses a curious public's need-to-know as they experience and buy more prestige wines. Their mission? To encourage more Americans to switch from their typical beverage of choice (i.e. a soft drink, like Coke or Pepsi, which is what a majority of Americans enjoy with their evening meal) to a glass of wine with dinner so one of the most important features of the book is a list of 150+ wines under $15. For just a dollar or two more per serving, everyone can enjoy something healthful and delicious that will make their dinner taste much better. One of the book's special features is an A-to-Z reference of more than 250 different wines and their flavor profiles. You can see, at a glance, how to pronounce the name of a wine (a stumbling block for many novices), can anticipate what the wine is likely to taste like (who knew that an Austrian riesling might have a hint of kaffir lime), learn how to serve it, discover the wine's most notable producers, and, most importantly, learn what foods to enjoy with it. Perhaps this is the team's greatest wish for you in what may be their best book yet."
Rozanne Gold, HuffingtonPost.com (November 29, 2011)

"On seeing Karen Page's and Andrew Dornenburg's FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE I had the chutzpah to think 'Steve Jobs would like its look.'...Second instant impression of FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE: It seems destined to medals equal in number to what Soviet Army generals wore."
New York Times wine writer Howard G. Goldberg, via Twitter @howardggoldberg (October 27, 2011)

TO MARKET, TO MARKET

"Of the many beloved food books sagging the shelves of book cases in my kitchen, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg's THE FLAVOR BIBLE is among those I turn to regularly. So, when the couple asked me to take a look at their new book, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE ($35/Little, Brown), I immediately accepted their invitation. I've been waiting for a book that would help me understand wine better and, of course, how to select what will make me happy. What I found is a thoroughly enjoyable primer for culinary enthusiasts who are trying to extend that pleasure to wine. Most of us who take great care about the ingredients we use in the kitchen or expect to be used when dining out have a certain knowledge base and language we access to make choices at the markets or on a menu. But, we need a similar knowledge base and language to make wine selections that make sense for us, for our wallet, and to beautifully accompany the food we so adore. Page and Dornenburg draw from their own extensive knowledge (they are also the authors of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT as well as that of winemakers, retailers, and sommeliers, including San Diego's own Jesse Rodriguez of Addison at the Grand Del Mar, to guide readers through the basics with an eye toward enabling us to have more confidence in our choices. They give a brief history of wine making in the U.S. (Did you know that in 1619 the male heads of households were commanded by law to plant grapevines or that in 1839 the first vineyards were planted in Napa Valley? The grower was George Calvert Yount as in Yountville.) From there, they take the reader on a journey into every aspect of grapes and wines that starts with the stories sommeliers tell of how they fell in love with wine and takes us into the intricacies of learning how to taste, how to read labels, how to discover our own palate, and how to pair wines with food. Wine is a pleasure. Learning about it shouldn't be tedious. Ordering it shouldn't be intimidating. By bringing sommeliers into the picture and, in fact, focusing an entire chapter on their strategies and secrets for mastering wine, Page and Dornenburg create a lively conversation among the professionals that makes it clear that their role is to be an educated guide. Contrary to the fear most diners have that sommeliers are simply trying to sell up a bottle or two, sommeliers here make it clear that they are there to help diners suss out what they'll enjoy at a price point they'll be comfortable with. It's what gives them pleasure in their work. Collaborate with an experienced sommelier and who knows what pleasures you'll experience. Similarly, learning little techniques that boost enjoyment of wine storage tips, opening tips, advice about using good-quality glassware, inspired pairings with food, and how to taste should be part of an enjoyable process. Each of these and more are addressed in the book, but importantly, not as finger-wagging directives but as suggestions that could change your opinion about a particular wine and even open you up to possibilities you hadn't considered. I was particularly taken by the section on composing meals. The authors take readers through the creation of a menu, noting the first principle is to move from light to heavy both in terms of food and wine. Success in this takes practice and they turn first to The French Laundry to offer guidance through each course and then sommeliers at places like The Little Nell, The Breakers, The Modern, and On the Square. In this chapter is also a very useful guide for matching wine to common dishes say, an omelet with Champagne and to common cuisines - Indian or Thai with Gewürztraminer. For one sommelier, Champagne is his go-to wine for Japanese food. Another loves Pinot Noir with Peking duck rolls and mu shu pork because the hoisin sauce's earthy-spicy-sweet personality mirrors that of the wine. That's the kind of insight that makes the book so useful. The middle of the book is devoted to a comprehensive directory of wines that identify the grapes, country of origin, full flavor profiles, tannin levels, and other key information all geared toward novice wine enthusiasts. The authors also include numerous additional resources websites and blogs, other books, a list of American Master Sommeliers, and wine magazines. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is truly the perfect place for an aspiring wine lover to get started and gain confidence."
Caron Golden, To Market, To Market with SanDiegoFoodstuff.com (December 5, 2011)

"You are the winner of a 2011 Gourmand Wine Book Award in the USA, and qualify for the next "Gourmand: Best in the World" competition with THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE in the category of Matching Food and Drinks. You can win again in the next step. The winner in each country will compete against winners in the same category in other countryies for The Best in The World. The results will be announced on March 6, 2012, at the annual Awards event. It will take place in Paris at Folies Bergere, the world-famous theater in the evening before the Paris Cookbook Fair (March 7-11, 2012). Congratulations!"
Gourmand World Cookbook Awards (December 6, 2011)

"Gourmand World Cookbook Awards: The winners by countries were announced December 15, 2011. These winners from 135 countries qualify for the Best in the World competition, thanks to the quality of their books...This year, we could publish the shortlist of finalists ahead of schedule, thanks to the hard work of the staff during Christmas and New Year and our new computer process. There are 283 finalists from 71 countries, with 4 finalists in each category....Shortlist for Matching Food and Drink: USA: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg."
GOURMAND Magazine: The International Cookbook Revue (January 2012)



"Wine Opus Two: My friends Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg have caught me by surprise again with their latest, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown $35). I hope they'll forgive me but I am going to confess that I have begun to find my long time friends, dare I say it? Increasingly boring. Endlessly working, always on deadline, editing and re-editing, never available for a restaurant reviewing jaunt.  I'm at my computer seven days a week too but I pull myself away at 6 and go out to dinner. When they said they were writing something, something, another something about wine, I didn't say what I thought. Like after their prize-winning best seller WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT what is there left to say?...I simply wasn't prepared for this amazing book, richly studded with the passionate musings of sommeliers, exhaustingly encyclopedic...They have collected the confessions and poetic musings of wine makers, wine-lovers, wine seller confidantes, with a toast to Julia and quotes from early Paul Bertolli and Alice Waters.  How to choose a wine by style. 150 wines under $15.  It's here. Like the best of encyclopedias, it compels me to just keep dipping in. What can they possibly do next?  I'll drink to that."
Gael Greene, "Fork Play," Insatiable-Critic.com (November 9, 2011)

"THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE Aims to Make You a Better Drinker: Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page know food and they know wine. The authors have penned award-winning titles such as THE FLAVOR BIBLE and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. Much like those books, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is a reference for food lovers and wine lovers alike who appreciate wine as an integral part of enjoying food. For the first time in history, Americans drank more wine than the French in 2009. In 2010, the U.S. became the largest wine-consuming country in the world. Many Americans however, still drink soft drinks with their meals. In this latest book, Dornenburg and Page seek to teach people that wine can be a healthful, affordable accompaniment to any meal and that by learning what flavors you like, how to read labels, select and serve wine, food lovers can expand their enjoyment of wine."
Sonja Groset, "Cooking the Books," Seattle Weekly (November 30, 2011)

"This Week's Show: New Orleans Chef John Besh shares his Family Table; Editor Jack Bishop of Cook’s Illustrated Talks about the Techniques of Home Cooking; Karen Page & Andrew Donenburg discuss their newest book on Food & Wine; and Fitness Expert Lisa Lynn creates your Workout Strategy for 2012...We love [THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE], by the way...It is the most anticipated reference book out this season. It's called THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, and it might be the best manual for understanding wine and your own personal flavor profile — so grab it and read it."
Chef Jamie Gwen, "North by Northwest," CBC.ca (January 14, 2012)

cornichon.org

"A Glass or Two with Karen & Andrew: You know you've looking at a good team when they finish each other's sentences. Even better, she talks for two minutes, and when she stops, he picks up. Without sounding the least bit scripted, they stay on topic. She talks about flavor, he talks about food. They make you want to read the book. Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg last breezed through Seattle when they were promoting book Number 8. Now it's Number 9: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. They've added a few new tricks to their repertoire. There's a list of 250 wines (varieties, origins) complete with flavor profiles, recommended pairings and best producers, so you'll never be intimidated by a wine list or wine shop again. Condensed example: Sancerre. Citrus & grass flavors, goat cheese, Henri Bourgeois. There are useful sidebars, too. Chris Miller of Spago talks about wines from Washington's Red Mountain AVA ("rustic tannic structure"). There's a list of 150 wines under $15. When it comes to actual wine and food combinations, Page and Dornenburg aren't dogmatic. Foie gras doesn't automatically mean 100-year-old Sauternes (though that does remain Page's iconic wine pairing). Sparkling rosé works very well, as does a California red. We've come a long way. The USA is now the world's largest consumer of wine, albeit we drink but a piddling amount, per capita. Still, wine has been made in every state of the union for the past decade. Barack Obama has a thousand bottles in his cellar back in Chicago. The nation's official dietary guidelines recommend a glass of wine a day for good health. And yet, only a quarter of Americans drink wine at all, let alone with dinner. Page and Dornenburg have their own heroes, the sommeliers who recommend specific bottles to restaurant-goers. Not the ones who look down their noses because you can't pronouce Montepulciano, not the ones who look at the brand of wristwatch you're wearing to guage now much you're going to spend, but the ones who truly care, who see themselves not just as salespeople but as guides on an exciting tour of the world's vineyards. No less than the chefs, it's the sommeliers who will guide us to a better future. New York City's a tough place to live. It's crowded, it's hectic, it's expensive. When you're on deadline, you order in. Fortunately, there's a wide array of cuisines, everything from Mexican to Indian, from Italian to Thai. And of course the busy writers have a glass or two with dinner. And what's in the bottle? 'Well, we're always running out of Riesling,' Page confides."
Ronald Holden, Cornichon.org and SlightlyPickled.blogspot.com (December 1, 2011)

"A discerning palate in food translates well to a discerning palate in wine because, well, they're both really about flavor. But wine and food literature have split ways in the past decade or so, with books and personalities focusing on one or the other but not both something Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg hope to reverse. The two authors' previous credits include THE FLAVOR BIBLE (2008) and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (2006), which fall along that same line of melding one's inner sommelier and gourmet. For their latest, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, the pair are hitting up two S.F. bookstores Monday (tonight!) and Tuesday evenings. The $35 book features informative sidebars and boxes to accompany its comprehensive guide to selecting and enjoying the right wines, which makes it easy to impress your connoisseur friends without having to study for a sommelier license and with four-color photography to illustrate your way."
Ellen Huet, SF Weekly (November 14, 2011)

"Wine connoisseurs can be hard to buy for, but one sure bet is THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. The authors, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, penned the popular THE FLAVOR BIBLE, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, and the cult classic CULINARY ARTISTRY. Former weekly wine columnists for The Washington Post, they’ve been honored with James Beard Awards. In this much anticipated volume, the authors break down wine into flavors, and celebrates America’s place as one of the world’s great growers of fine wine."
Michall Jeffers, WomanAroundTown.com (December 22, 2011)

"Enhancing the Wine 'Experience': You may file today’s blog under 'Three Wine Things We Like That Aren’t Wine.' Or, if your file folder flap isn’t big enough for all those words, just go with 'Wine Things.' ... Thing No. 2: Wine Book From the authors of THE FLAVOR BIBLE and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT comes another essential text for foodies: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. This time, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg take an encyclopedic approach to the subject of food-and-wine pairing, and the gorgeous photography makes the book almost as much fun to gaze upon as it is to read. Seen on Amazon recently for just over $20."
Robert Johnson, Editor, Vinesse.com (May 2, 2012)

"New Cookbooks with Alison Fryer, owner of The Cookbook Store in Toronto: For the wine lover on the list, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg the people who wrote THE FLAVOR BIBLE and CULINARY ARTISTRY. This is is their latest one, and it's all about wine: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. Instead of being for the wine geek, this is from food perspective... Fantastic...And their pairing suggestions and matches are, bar none, the best out there.... "
Malcolm Jolley, GoodFoodRevolution.com, Ontario's weekly good food and wine news site (November 4, 2011)

"'Nouveau Day,' by French Law, is the Third Thursday in November. It is known worldwide as Beaujolais Day and will occur, this year, on 17 November. Normally, the release of 2011 Beaujolais Nouveau would highlight the day. But this year is different. This year there is a twist: Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg are releasing their long-awaited new book THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown)... In association with Les Dames d'Escoffier New York, a wine (Beaujolais), food and book signing will take place at GALLERY 15, 132 West 18th Street, from 5:30-7:30pm. Bottles of 2011 Beaujolais Nouveau and 2010 Beaujolais Cru will be flowing while hors d'oeuvres from Chef Robert Gurvich (Alison Eighteen) will be served. While the festivities take place, Karen and Andrew will be signing their sure-to-be classic FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE book. Tickets are $65 for the public and are available by sending an RSVP to: Nora@QWwineexperts.com."
Philip S. Kampe, TheWineHub.com (November 11, 2011)

SHARON'S WINE LINE

"Every year hundreds of new cookbooks and books about food and books about wine join the thousands already published. But books about food and wine, well, that’s a different story. You can count them on one hand – well, maybe two or three hands. Fortunately, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, the First Couple of Food-and-Wine, have just written their second book that explains and simplifies the art of pairing food and wine. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown; 336 pp.; $35) picks up where WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT left off. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE describes the flavors of some 250 wines and varietals. (The authors’ nickname for the new book is 'The Flavor Bible for Wine Drinkers.') It calls upon the familiar language of food as the logical pathway to understanding wine. While more and more Americans are interested in wine – as of 2011, the U.S. is the world’s number-one consumer of it – many are overwhelmed by the thousands of choices. The authors want to educate consumers and demystify wine, to take the fear out of buying wine and matching it with food. To accomplish this, they have enlisted the help of dozens of the world’s best sommeliers. Their opinions, advice, passions, loves and secrets play a crucial and entertaining part in this book. The heart of the book is a hefty chapter that profiles more than 250 different wines by grape, region, intensity, acidity, flavors, texture, food pairings, notable producers and more. In this section, you really get to know the characteristics of and differences among the wines. Included, of course, are the usual suspects – Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon – and many of the unusual, like Roter Veltliner, Saperavi, Taurasi, Terroldego, Tsinandali. I especially enjoyed the dozens of sidebars on topics such as 'Matching Wine to Common Dishes,' 'Go-To Wines: Sommeliers’ Picks of Wines That Never Let Them Down,' 'Choosing a Wine by Flavors,' 'Wines Under $15,' 'Second Label [Lower-Priced] Wines [from Top Producers].' The last chapter features recommended books, websites and magazines. Bottom Line: With Page and Dornenburg as your guides, you’ll feel comfortable selecting wine, serving it and enjoying it regularly. Their enthusiasm and their love of wine and food are infectious. They’ve written another must-have book for anyone interested in food-and-wine pairing. It’s empowering, eminently browsable and just plain fun."
Sharon Kapnick, wine writer (for publications ranging from Time to The Oxford Companion to Food and Drink), SharonsWineLine.wordpress.com (November 21, 2011)

Good Housekeeping

"Best Last-Minute Gift: Ten Great Cookbooks: Are you feeling as frantic as I am? I haven't finished my Christmas shopping and it's December 23rd. My solution: cookbooks! Here are 10 of my favorites from this past year....THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE: Not a cookbook, but a necessary companion to all of the above. This tome will teach you how to perfectly pair wines with your meals. An invaluable asset to any cookbook collection."
—Genevieve Ko, Good Housekeeping (December 23, 2011)

"FOOD: [15] BEST COOKBOOKS IN '11: Tasteful Reading: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Little, Brown, $35). There is no shortage of wine primers out there, but books that lucidly handle the complex and mysterious art of pairing wine with food are rare. This ambitious and comprehensive effort comes from the authors of THE FLAVOR BIBLE, and offers similarly methodical approach, surveying a host of industry experts for wisdom on different ways to consider wine — by 'weight,' 'volume,' or simply finding new wines similar to old favorites. The most useful part of the book, though, is the A-Z encyclopedia of 250 wines with pairing advice and suggestions on the best producers. That is followed, in turn, by a companion chapter surveying sommeliers for pairings with specific courses."
Craig LaBan, Philadelphia Inquirer (December 15, 2011)

The Philadelphia
Jewish Voice

"According to Jill Ross, proprietor of The Cookbook Stall at the Reading Terminal Market [in Philadelphia], children's cookbooks have become more popular than ever and there is now a boom in cookbooks marketed to teens....Ross's personal favorite titles are books by Heidi Swanson (whose newest title is: Super Natural Every Day: Well-loved Recipes from My Natural Foods Kitchen) because she's a vegetarian.  However, she also loves the River Cottage cookbooks by the British chef, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, because they're so lovingly written and they've helped her learn how to prepare meat for others.  She also adores the reference books by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, whose newest title is THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE."
Hannah Lee, Philadelphia Jewish Voice (February 28, 2012)

Vinecdote

"Five Best Wine Gifts Online: Today is Cyber Monday, which means workers are typing away for dear life buying holiday gifts online and quickly pulling up the screensaver if someone in authority happens to stroll by. But you don’t really want to spent eleventy dollars on that new Just Dance Wii game that is only going to collect dust in the media cabinet, do you? No, of course not. What you want to do is buy something useful, something that will add joy to your life, something that will be gone before it has time to collect so much as one dust bunnykin. In short, you want wine. To help you on that quest, here are links to some of my favorite wines and related merchandise available online...THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, a brilliant book by the brilliant Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. This book is the exact opposite of the traditional view of wine something being solemnly sipped and spit by a bevy of experts. Instead, the authors look at wine from the perspective of food, presenting information on more than 250 wines but all in the context of how you’d actually use it, in a glass, next to a plate. There are lots of handy little sidebars and extensive commentary from those in the front line of wine-food pairing, sommeliers. The book is pretty enough for a coffee table with its beautiful photos by Tom Kirkman, but I’ve got a feeling this is going to end up on my kitchen shelf getting the dog-eared look of some of my favorite cookbooks. SRP $35."
Michele Locke, Vinecdote.com (November 28, 2011)

"A Good Wine and Food Book for 2012: Finishing off the year on a positive note is always a good plan, and I'd like to recommend THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Little, Brown, $35). These estimable authors have already written some good books on the same topic, and this one has lots of information for any reader, no matter the level of sophistication. It's quirky. All sorts of sidebars, info graphics, lists, quotes, and factoids bubble up in the text, and you're borne along in a conversation with real people, rather than being sat down and lectured. It helps that the authors and I share a lot of favorite sommeliers, wineries, and tactics it's certainly easier to like a book you agree with on the matters at hand. But even if didn't see eye-to-eye with them, the opinions are presented intelligently. Do I have quibbles? Sure, I'm a professional quibbler, and wine is ultimately subjective. But that sense of individual personality, both in bottles and the people who love them, comes through here. So grab a copy, act on some of their specific, very smart recommendations and then form your own opinions. And Happy New Year!"
—Ted Loos, Epicurious.com (December 30, 2011)

"Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg discuss wine and food pairings for Valentine’s Day and any day. Their latest book THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is an encyclopedic guide to hundreds of wines by their essential characteristics from body and intensity to distinguishing flavors, from suggested serving temperatures and ideal food pairings."
"The Leonard Lopate Show," WNYC Radio (February 13, 2012)

"I really love the books of Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg.  I met them back in 2008 and I've been a fan of both them and their books ever since. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT is one of my favorite books; I'm going to go out on a limb and say I use it more than any other food- or wine-related book on my shelves.  It makes sense, of course, seeing as I drink wine with every dinner (and sometimes with lunch), and I consult this book nearly every time.  I also highly recommend THE FLAVOR BIBLE.  I don't use it as much since I don't regularly go off-recipe when making a meal, but it's a brilliant resource when you're cooking off-the-cuff, trying to make something happen from random ingredients in your fridge.  Ultimately, both books are useful, smart, and reliable; I couldn't do without them....So I was ecstatic to get Page and Dornenburg's most recent book THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, which appears to have a lofty goal: marry the concept of WTDWWYE and THE FLAVOR BIBLE to make one major reference tome....One of the things that I love about this book is the historical timeline.  Yes, Page and Dornenburg actually try to tackle that beast: the history of wine in the United States....Last but not least, a major bonus especially for newbies is that each wine listed also includes a pronunciation key!  I recently discovered the Bastianich Friulano and had no idea how to pronounce Friulano...but no more (it's free-oo-LAH-noh).  Now I can feel like less of a jerk when I ask for it at Eataly!"
Laura Lutz, PinotAndProse.blogspot.com (November 4, 2011)

"This Weekend on the Show: Sunday: Authors Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page will be in the NXNW Cooking Club. He's a chef, she's a journalist and together they have written a number of best selling books including the iconic FLAVOUR BIBLE.  Their latest work is THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE.  It's a very user- friendly compendium with lots of advice on how to choose and serve wine, and much else, too!"
Sheryl MacKay, "North by Northwest," CBC.ca (January 14, 2012)

"Wine & Spirits Gift Guide: Best gift for the curious culinary-minded oenophile: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. Perhaps the best gift you can give a wine loving friend is the information they need to make informed, delicious decisions when selecting a bottle from the store rack or the restaurant wine list. From the authors of THE FLAVOR BIBLE and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT comes an encyclopedic, A to Z guide profiling hundreds of different wines by their characteristics: body, intensity, aromas and flavors, ideal food pairings and recommended producers. Former Washington Post wine writers Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg provide insights from dozens of America’s best sommeliers, but including informative sidebars, charts and boxes, as well as color photography."
Kelly Magiarics, Washington Life magazine (December 16, 2011)

"THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is a beautiful book...It has become part of Napa Valley Wine Library's permanent collection."
Carolyn Martini, President, Napa Valley Wine Library Association (November 21, 2011)

"THE WINE GUY: Wine books for winter reading while you sip: The coming winter months are a good time to curl up with a book and (of course) a glass of wine. And what better time to fortify your wine knowledge? How about a resolution to better appreciate the diversity of wine? Here are three recommendations for good reference books you will enjoy reading and that will help you enjoy wine more. I’m often skeptical of wine and food pairing advice. But THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Little, Brown, $35), the culinary authors’ eighth book, is a notable exception. Page and Dornenburg begin with the recognition that wine is food, quoting Michael Pollan’s healthful advice: 'Drink wine. With food. Not too much.' Noting they love food first and wine second, the authors declare their greatest interest in wine is 'its ability to make food taste better.' Their focus on flavor, both of the wine and the food, is key to enhancing the food/wine experience. The book is distinctive for its approach of asking sommeliers their thoughts and advice about such things as their favorite grapes, regions and pairings, along with wine service instructions. These insights mostly avoid geek-speak and really bring the topic to life. Providing context, Page and Dornenburg begin the book with an informative timeline of wine in America. Throughout the book, helpful sidebars, lists and tips provide additional detail and perspective. Given that wine is a beverage meant to be enjoyed daily, I especially appreciated the list of wine best buys – 150 wines under $15. The book covers more than 250 types of wine with information on pronunciation, grapes used, origins, top producers, flavor profiles and food pairing ideas. It is so packed with information that I expect to be referring back to it many times."
—Rich Mauro, Colorado Springs Gazette (January 3, 2012) and RMPeoplesPalate.com (January 5, 2012)

"Authors Light Up the World of Wine: Wine has become one of the most fashionable libations in the past 10 years. According to Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg in the preface of their newest book, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, 'It's true that as of 2009, Americans drank more wine than the French, and in 2010 the United States became the world's largest wine-consuming country for the first time in history, a significant watershed moment in food and wine culture.' What's not to love about wine? It has a rich history. It has health benefits, when consumed responsibly. It tastes good and it makes food taste better. However, many of us have a hard time figuring out what a good wine is and how to pair it with the everyday meals we make.For the longest time, I admit, I chose wines by their labels. (Sometimes I still do.) Thankfully, Page and Dornenburg in their book, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE give great insights into more than 250 varieties. For each wine presented, the authors provide pronunciation, country of origin, region, color, grapes, weight, volume, dry/sweet, acidity, tannin, flavors, texture, temperature, comparables, season, pairings, tips, aging, producers and iconic examples. In other words, if you don't know about wine, don't worry. Page and Dornenburg will bring you up to speed...."
Amanda McGuire Rzicznek, food columnist, BG News (January 20, 2012)

"If you've ever wanted to pick the brains of the country's top wine experts and sommeliers, thank authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. They've done the job for you. Their new book, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown; $35), is written in a way that's, well, a foodie's approach to learning about wine. 'Too many experts go too much into the technical detail around newbies,' Page says. When talking to a sommelier or buying wine at a shop, they recommend describing wine in familiar terms. 'I think people don't realize that they can talk in a language of food about wine and describe what they like,' Dornenburg says. For example, if you tell a sommelier you like almonds, he or she might recommend sherry; for peaches, options include chardonnay, Riesling or Viognier; and mushrooms might mean a pinot noir. But before you even get to that point, the book explains ways to help readers relate to wine on a personal level. It begins with a timeline of American wine events and vignettes from notable sommeliers who share their first experiences with wine. It's fascinating to read about the sommelier whose family drank only Franzia White Zinfandel or Le Bernadin sommelier Aldo Sohm, who writes in the introduction that while he serves and tastes $1,000 bottles at the restaurant, most of the wines he drinks at home cost less than $15. That's the thing about wine. Everyone has to start somewhere and everyone enjoys drinking great wines that don't cost an arm and a leg. Other chapters feature strategies and secrets from sommeliers, and knowing your wines. An A-to-Z guide of varietal listings includes general information, such as country, primary grapes used, acidity and tannin, as well as helpful tidbits about optimal serving temperature, pairing tips, aging recommendations and notable producers. Those listings are also a good guide as to how to make notes when you're tasting wine. Page says it can be anything. 'Literally whatever comes into their head. I've become much more intuitive and trusting of my first reaction. In some cases, it's a single word, or a memory,' she says. 'It doesn't need to make sense. It doesn't have to analytical, it can be intuitive. Taste is so personal, we all taste different things, and that's OK'.”
Jennifer McInnis, San Antonio Express-News (January 31, 2012)

"Ham, lamb, gefilte fish, deviled eggs and marshmallow Peeps. Like most holiday meals, Easter and Passover brunches and dinners can provide quite the wine pairing conundrum. With so many contrasting flavors appearing on the table, what to drink? We turned to Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, co-authors of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE for advice. For Brunch: Go Sparkling. Bubbles have the advantage of being both celebratory and famously food-friendly. Consider a dry Blanc de Blancs Champagne or a domestic sparkling wine to pair with deviled Easter eggs. Or try a Bugey, Brachetto d’Acqui, or Moscato d’Asti, which all have a touch of sweetness that will help them stand up to sweet Hot Cross Buns. With Ham: A Fruity White, Red or Pink. Baked ham may seem like a difficult pairing but in reality it can go with white, red or rosé wine. The trick is to work with lighter, fruitier wines. For whites, look to Riesling or Gewurztraminer. For reds, go for Beaujolais or Pinot Noir...."
—Lisa McLaughlin, CookingDistrict.com (April 3, 2012)

"Thank you so much for THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE...Such a treasure!"
Margrit Mondavi, Vice President - Art & Culture, Robert Mondavi Winery (November 21, 2011)

"A Book for Food Lovers Who Love Wine: Why THE FOOD LOVERS GUIDE TO WINE makes a perfect holiday gift: If Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg’s new book, THE FOOD LOVERS GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown, $35), were on a restaurant menu, it would be a chateauneuf-du-pape paired with a cassoulet — there’s a little of everything in it for everyone who pays attention to what they eat and what they drink with it. Page and Dornenburg, who are paired in marriage as well as in writing books, are veterans at this, as previous authors of THE FLAVOR BIBLE and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. So this is not 'wine for dummies.' Instead, this book is for people who spend as much time thinking about eating and drinking as they actually do performing those acts."
Roger Morris, TheDailyMeal.com (December 16, 2011)

"When Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg published THE FLAVOR BIBLE, three years ago, they gave home cooks the know-how they needed to graduate from by-the-book recipes to assured improvisation. And now with the JBF Award–winning duo’s recent release of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown), which is just as thorough and informative as its predecessor, home cooks can now match wine and food with equal aplomb. This essential guide includes a clearly organized list of flavor profiles for more than 250 grapes; a fascinating timeline of the history of wine in America; and valuable tips dispensed by the country’s best sommeliers, like Monkey Bar’s Belinda Chang and Barbara Lynch Gruppo’s Cat Silirie."
Anna Mowry, Delights & Prejudices: The James Beard Foundation Blog (November 30, 2011)

Mark Oldman

"Three Wine Books that Ably Bridge the Abyss...It is doubly difficult writing a wine book, because friends and family assume that focusing on such a glorious subject must make the process pleasurable, if not downright sozzling.  Not so, I say, writing on wine is more like pulling endless an all-nighter in the basement office of a vacation resort: it doesn’t matter how close you are to the beach, you are there to toil. And toil it is, if you want to add something fresh to the oceanic body of wine writing...The following are three recently-released wine books, each different in approach, but all admirable for their ability to bridge the abyss of wine complexity: 1) THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. Authors, sybarites, and culinary chroniclers, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg produce another masterful and boundlessly useful tome.  Powered by dozens of interviews with top sommeliers around the world, the book provides encyclopedic coverage of over 200 wine types, each described in terms of the wine’s essential flavor components.  Four-color and sleekly designed, it is supercharged with nuggets of advice, tips, and original features such as a time-line of historical wine events.  It is a must-have for novices, connoisseurs, and restaurant professionals."
Award-winning wine writer Mark Oldman, MarkOldman.com (November 25, 2011)

METROACTIVE

"Trying to figure out what to give the wine lover in your life takes some thought. The obvious choice, of course, is a bottle of wine. Wine books are an wonderful alternative gift choice. Not only are they perfect for the novice, enthusiast and expert, they can be read over and over again, you don’t have to replace the cork, and the pages are always full! Here is a collection of wine books released in 2011 that should satisfy the intellectual palate of any wine lover in your life: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page; Andrew Dornenburg."
Wine writer Liz Palmer, METROACTIVE (November 24, 2011)

www.tabletalkradio.net

"Tune in today, when we talk to authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg about their new book, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. We’ll also be tossing around food and wine ideas for the upcoming holidays.as 'acidity' and 'flavors,' and reliable producers. A lot of good advice on food and wine pairing follows...A fabulous guide to wine...Super helpful and useful."
Jamie Peha and Thierry Rautureau, Table Talk Radio (December 14, 2011)

"Fifty years ago this month was the first publication of Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking...Last night I went to a wonderful panel discussion [celebrating the book's 50th anniversary] and there was a large screen playing segments from her series 'The French Chef' and in every segment, there was always a glass of wine on her cooking counter or as she sat down to the table because for Julia, of course, you couldn't have a proper meal without a glass of wine, and the two complemented each other. And my guests today will help illustrate why that is so important, and tell us a little bit about American wines, and why there was for a long time this disconnect, because Julia Child really brought that back to us and said, 'This is what you should eat and drink with dinner.' My guests today are Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, the authors of so many wonderful books, and their newest book is called THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE but their other books are WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, THE FLAVOR BIBLE, which I love it IS a bible, BECOMING A CHEF, THE NEW AMERICAN CHEF, so many books! And I welcome them today to talk specifically about their new book but also about American wine because it has a history that a lot of us are not aware of....I have to say, I was expecting 'another big wine book' you'd have to plod through...but it's not that at all. I LOVE this book!"
Culinary historian and host Linda Pelaccio, "A Taste of the Past," Heritage Radio Network (October 20, 2011)

"A Great Resource for Wine Lovers, from Beginners to Experts: The authors of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, are an impressive couple. Known for their collaboration on BECOMING A CHEF and CULINARY ARTISTRY they have, in recent years, authored books that teach us how to follow our tastes in choosing what we eat and drink. The first in this series, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, a guide to food and beverage pairings, collected several awards including the 2006 Georges Duboeuf 'Wine Book of the Year' and the 2007 IACP Cookbook Award, among others. That was followed by THE FLAVOR BIBLE, a guide to combining ingredients without a formal recipe, which won the 2009 James Beard Book Award for Reference and Scholarship. They've been recognized for their palates and ability to educate the public in how to choose and match ingredients, food and drink to please our own tastes. This newest book in that series is takes those lessons even further. This book is like the experience of taking a wine appreciation course without the wine that you'll have to supply on your own. It begins with a detailed history of wine growing and wine appreciation in the United States, dating back to 1607 with the arrival of settlers in Jamestown, VA. You'll learn about the commercial establishment of many U.S. wineries still in operation today; the devastation of the phylloxera attack during the late 19th and early 20th centuries; the appearance of wine at dinners in the White House; the founding of respected wine publications; and the progression of food and wine pairings in magazines and restaurants. After laying that background, the authors take us on a journey of wine exploration by taste. What tastes do you like? What food flavors do you enjoy? Teaching us to respect our own taste preferences is the ultimate goal of these lessons. And although Page and Dornenburg are respected for their palates, the advice they share comes from dozens of sommeliers around the country. These sommeliers proceed to share with us their advice for learning about wine in the following chapter. Finally, we arrive at the lists, the heart of this reference book. Over 250 wines are profiled by grape, region, weight, intensity, flavors, food pairings, notable producers and other details. Not to be missed is the list of 150 wines Under $15. The lists are peppered with opinions and advice from the experts. Although the lists included pairing advice, there's an entire chapter devoted to advice on food and wine pairing. Once you've selected your wine, you'll want to check the book's advice on serving and enjoying the wine including advice on decanting and glassware. And in case you forget some of the terminology presented throughout the book, there's a glossary provided for easy reference."
Donna Pilato, Entertaining.About.com (January 23, 2012)

"...If you are even half as geeky as my coworker thinks I am, you’ll wanna put these books on that holiday wish list of yours. Forget the miter saw, nix the bottle of perfume and cross out the Dr. Who DVD box set, then throw these on...THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg) – I have raved upside down and backwards about the books that Karen and Andrew crank out, and this one joins their ranks. What I love about their publications is the sense of creative culinary OCD that they bring to food and wine. This one catalogs over 250 different wines by grape, region, flavor profiles, etc. and breaks them down for the wine newbie/food geek. Look up Brachetto D’Acqui and you’ll not only see that it’s a light-bodied red made from the Italian brachetto grape…you’ll also find that it typically has notes of cherries, raspberries, roses and vanilla, should be served chilled, pairs best with chocolate desserts and is made by Banfi, Braida, Regali and a bunch more. It deserves as much praise as I gave their masterpiece, THE FLAVOR BIBLE."
Katie Pizzuto, GonzoGastronomy.com (December 7, 2011)

"The 11 Best Food Books Of 2011: We've managed to consume more than just food this year we consumed some food books too! We were pretty pleased with the crop these books have allowed us to evaluate our eating choices, vicariously eat some incredibly tasty meals and learn a few things about the world in which we live...Even if you don't consider yourself much of a cook, and if you've never found yourself particularly fascinated by the world of food, many of these titles are nonetheless worth a read. Although food may be the primary subject of these books, you end up learning about business, culture, health and more as well. Enjoy the page turning! Check out our 11 favorite food books of 2011: Because most literature on wine is geared towards seasoned wine drinkers, it can be hard for budding oenophiles to learn the ropes. That's why THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE comes as such a relief. It offers smart, well-informed advice and guidance about wine to people who care about fine cuisine but don't know as much about drinking as they do about eating. The most helpful section of the tome may be Chapter 4 ("Know Your Wines: The Lists"), a 140-page glossary of crucial wine terms. It breaks down the specificities of vinicultural regions, types of wine and wine-making methods with equal clarity and precision, using language any enthusiastic eater can understand."
Carey Polis, Associate Food Editor, HuffingtonPost.com (November 29, 2011)

InezSays

"So, I just got this really great wine & food book, and I’m not just saying it’s good because the authors are all about the sommeliers.  I’m saying it because it’s incredibly insightful and cutting edge, and it’s in a league all of its own as far as wine books are concerned."
Inez Ribustello, sommelier and co-owner of On the Square, InezSays.com (November 7, 2011)

"The Perfect Gift: The Mostest for Your Hostess: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page with Andrew Dornenburg, $35. Signed copies available while supplies last. Food and wine. The perfect marriage. Here is a definitive guide on how the flavors of different wines inform the food that you eat. You don't need to be a wine connoisseur to appreciate this guide but I assure you, you will want to become one afterward."
Pat, R.J. Julia Independent Bookstellers (Holiday 2011 catalog)

"Foodista Cookbook Awards 2011: This is Foodista's first annual cookbook awards.  We read, we tested, and we tasted...Check out our [16] favorites of 2011...Best Cookbook with Wine Focus: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE [by Karen Page with Andrew Dornenburg]."
—Leah Rodrigues, Foodista.com (December 30, 2011)


"Even the most devoted foodies and wine aficionados can be flummoxed by the best wine-and-food pairings. Good news then that there’s a new book, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, to solve the headache, says David Lincoln Ross....Two experts who do manage to nimbly navigate this tricky terrain are food-and-wine writers Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, whose newest tome THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is packed with useful information and practical advice about making the most of marrying a bottle of wine with a meal, whether home cooked or out on the road. Page and Dornenburg start from the premise that 'what we love most about wine is its ability to make food taste even better.' This simple but important thought animates their thorough but entertaining book in which the authors urge the reader to 'think of learning about wine as playtime.' Perhaps the book’s strongest feature is a series of extended comments about complementary food-and-wine pairings from some two dozen of the country’s most talented sommeliers — Michel Couvreux at Per Se in New York on becoming a sommelier; Cat Silirie at No. 9 Park in Boston on avoiding big-time wine brands; and Raj Vaidya of Restaurant Daniel in New York on Burgundy....The authors have also added an informative timeline of highlights in American wine-and-food history from 1607 to the present. But the heart of the book, Chapter 4, features a succinct, yet comprehensive alphabetical listing of key wine regions, grape types, and specific wine appellations — entries range from agiorgitiko, a Greek red grape, to zweigelt, an Austrian red grape. As with the book’s other chapters, this A–Z compendium is liberally interspersed with sommelier tips about how to ask for and receive the best advice possible from a wine steward or sommelier, and if one is not around, how to confidently choose a never-before-tried wine selection on your own. Like the authors’ previous food and wine book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, published by Bulfinch in 2006, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE should become a standard reference for both wine beginners and avid connoisseurs, packed as it is with so much useful advice and insider tips. In short, Page and Dornenburg take the danger out of unexpected but pleasurable vinous liaisons we all look for with each pop of the cork."
David Lincoln Ross, TheDailyBeast.com (January 6, 2012)

The Everyday Palate

"I am obsessed with the end of the world....And so I find myself considering, if I had to pack a bag in twenty minutes, what would I shove in it. Sure, Smartwool base layers, socks galore, and water are all viable options, but I know to stay sane I would need a few books. Jane Kenyon's Otherwise, Jane Austen's Pride and Predjuice, and definitely THE ultimate in cooking reference Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg's THE FLAVOR BIBLE.   Yes, I would choose THE FLAVOR BIBLE over any of Nigel Slater's, Jamie Oliver's and Alice Waters' cookbooks. If you know me, that's says volumes about how much I respect and use THE FLAVOR BIBLE. I've cited in many of my BG News articles, and I've opened it countless times while developing recipes or planning elaborate Sunday evening meals. Want to know what flavors are compatible with rosemary? Look up rosemary and you will find yourself immersed in a list that will NEVER lead you astray. God bless you, Karen and Andrew. When Sarah L., co-star of Spatula and dear friend, showed me the latest addition to the Page and Dornenburg collection of food books, I flipped my lid: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. There's no doubt I'm a food lover. And there's even littler doubt that I love wine maybe to a fault at times...But as a food lover, I've been really wanting to work on collecting awesome wines and, better yet, pairing them with food that would create a holy matrimony on my palate. Additionally, becoming a gluten-free household has made us much more aware of wine's radness! As Page and Dornenburg share through quotes from Michael Pollan, Alice Waters, and Julia Child (aka gods of food and wine), food is better when paired with wine AND, when consumed moderately, wine is actually good for your health. In the preface, the authors thoughtfully and intelligently spell out the benefits of drinking wine and defend wine as something that is accessible to Americans '...in 2010 the United States became the world's largest wine-consuming country for the first time in history...' In the following chapters, the authors include a timeline of notable events in American wine history; reflections from articulate, down-to-earth sommeliers; a how-to for talking about wine; and the beauty of winemaking. These are the chapters I really found myself lost in a good way as I read and reread passages, taking notes. What I really enjoy is the authors' writing style. They identify with their audience  by using casual diction, a relatable tone, and humor at times. At least I laughed out loud when I read the last point in the 'What Information Is Required on a Wine Label?' box: 'The government warning ('Consumption of alcoholic beverages impairs your ability to drive a car or operate machinery')'. Probably one of my favorite lists is the 'Wines Under $15.' As someone who does not drink commercial pop (soda) and who is on a budget, this list of over 150 wines really hit home. I realized many of them were ones I have found and bought at my local Kroger or better yet at The Anderson's. Also, I'm a fan that the authors championed boxed wines. Too often boxed wines get bad reputations, when, many times, they can stand up a good bottle of value wine. Finally, I like how the wines are listed. The authors provide pronunciation, country, region, color, grapes, weight, volume, dry/sweet, acidity, tannin, flavors, texture, temperature, comparables, season, pairings, tips, aging, producers, and iconic examples for more than 250 wines. AWESOME, right? I've learned a lot from just nonchalantly flipping through Chapter 4 a little bit each evening, sometimes while listening to tunes or watching Law & Order."
—Amanda McGuire Rzicnek, EverydayPalate.blogspot.com (January 5, 2012)

"If you loved THE FLAVOR BIBLE, drank up WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, you'll love THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE."
Celia Sack, owner of Omnivore Books, named one of America's 7 Best Culinary Bookstores in Bon Appetit, via Twitter (November 14, 2011)

"If you're looking for the inside scoop on the world of wine from the industry's top professionals, look no further. Reading the book was like a late-night get-together over a bottle of wine with a table of my favorite sommeliers. Great job!"
Sabato Sagaria, Director of Food & Beverage, The Little Nell Hotel in Aspen (December 14, 2011)

"Authors of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT Karen Page and Andrew Dornernburg bring us a new book THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE...If you are familiar with their work you have come to know that their booksWHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT and THE FLAVOR BIBLE have become a must- have among wine and food aficionados...The authors have interviewed some of the top hats in the sommeliers world including Aldo Sohm, Sommelier for Le Bernardin in New York and 2008 Word’s Best Sommelier, who wrote the book’s introduction...This new book enlightens all of us with a wealth of knowledge that helps us appreciate, even further, the pairing of certain foods with certain wines."
Julie Santiago, Napa Valley Wine Examiner (November 12, 2011)

Jennie in the Kitchen

"You’ve heard the proverb: 'Give a man a fish, feed him for a day; teach a man to fish, feed him for a lifetime.' In that spirit, as you contemplate your list of last-minute holiday gifts — as well as host and hostess gifts for holiday parties — sidestep the impulse to second guess what bottle of wine your recipient might like. Instead, why not offer a window into the world of wine? Any one of this quartet of wine and recipe books will do the job quite nicely....A Wine Education in a Book: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE...In their latest encyclopedic work, the couple takes a slightly different tack, sharing flavor profiles and other information for over 250 wines, organized alphabetically so you can easily jump to the information you seek....The book’s 135 pages of detailed listings provide enough information to answer basic questions about flavor, grape varietals, producer, and so forth without making your head spin. Information on over 250 wines will help you to correctly pronounce their names (no more embarrassing dinner party or wine-ordering gaffs), what flavors to expect from them in terms you are likely to understand — berries, flowers, and orange peel rather than forest floor, cigar box, and cat pee, and which foods go best with which wines. The best wine merchants begin by getting to know what you already like, suggesting other wines that will pleasantly surprise you with your favored characteristics; this book does the same."
Jennie Schacht, Jennie in the Kitchen (December 22, 2011)

"Gift Ideas for Wine Lovers: From top-notch to not-so-serious, here are the suggestions: 1) For someone who likes to read (about wine): THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page with Andrew Dornenburg (Little, Brown & Co., 2011, $35: hardcover). From the former weekly wine columnists for The Washington Post, this is a smart, practical book that should be in every wine geek's library. It's a fascinating compendium about selecting, serving and enjoying wine. Much of the information is drawn from sommeliers at top restaurants such as Blue Hill in New York and French Laundry in California. There are lots of sidebars and lists. You'll learn the 'Ten Secrets for Getting More Pleasure from Wine' and come across a rundown of 150 wines under $15. One of the most helpful sections is an alphabetical directory of wines that includes flavor profiles and pairing suggestions. There's no index, so readers just have to graze through the book, sampling the many tidbits."
Anne Schamberg, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel (December 2, 2011)

"Image of the Day: Omnivore & Oenophiles: On Monday, Omnivore Books on Food, San Francisco, hosted a party for THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown) by husband and wife Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. The occasion was also a time for celebration for the store, which that day was named by Bon Appétit as one of the seven best culinary bookstores in the country. Food and wine lovers attending included chefs, sommeliers, home cooks and other authors. Here (from l.): Dornenburg; Omnivore owner Celia Sack; and Page."
Shelf Awareness (November 17, 2011)

"Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg's Wine Pairings for Candy Canes and Gingerbread Houses: Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and New Year's are just around the corner, meaning holiday feasting is soon upon us. And with holiday eating comes holiday boozing. Now, some holiday celebrations call for downing whatever bottle of bubbly is in the fridge, but for a perfect gourmet pairing, we got in touch with Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, authors of THE FLAVOR BIBLE and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. Their most recent tome, THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, is a handy compendium and reference guide encompassing everything you need to know about vino and wine producers around the world. We gave them five favorite holiday treats and asked them what wine they'd pair with them and why...."
Lauren Shockey, Village Voice (December 19, 2011)

"Ask Tom: It's a 1 Percent question: How much should a diner tip on a pricey bottle of wine? ... Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, authors of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (Little, Brown; 2011), suggest tipping 15 [to 20] percent in the 'gray area' between $100 and $500 a bottle. 'Particularly at a high-end restaurant, the couple wrote in an e-mail, 'excellent service is ofthen the result of an entire army of sommeliers, captains, wait staff, etc., who all share in the tip pool and are dependent on tips to earn their living.' Something diners many not know: 'By law,' the authors say, 'restaurants in many states can deduct the credit card fees (3 percent) from your gratuity...'"
Tom Sietsema, The Washington Post Magazine (January 8, 2012)

"What a wonderful book! Thank you both for your great work in food and wine writing."

Cat Silirie, sommelier

"THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg is a great book that gives very interesting and valuable information and suggestions for the food lover, or anyone else, who wants to learn more about wine. Those of you who are regular readers of Wine Peeps know that the book WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page is one of my favorite references when planning our regular wine tasting dinners and our challenging wine pairing dinners. This talented writing couple has also written THE FLAVOR BIBLE, which is a great guide to culinary creativity, and has now written another winner in THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. Traditionally, food books and cookbooks haven’t mentioned wine and most wine books haven’t given food suggestions. Karen and Andrew have changed all that with their books, and that is what has made their books so attractive to me....I could go on and on, but the bottom line is that THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE provides great information that is presented in an attractive and easy-to-read style. I would recommend your getting a copy for yourself and, also, consider it as a great Christmas gift for the food or wine lovers in your life."
LaGayle Sosnowy, WinePeeps.com (November 9, 2011)

"'How to Be a Great Holiday Party Guest and Host: Tis the season for parties! To increase the odds that you and your family members will be happy hosts and guests, I talked with James Beard Award-winning authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg — the husband-and-wife team behind the 140,000-copy bestseller THE FLAVOR BIBLE, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, and this month's new release THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE (featured in a book video and just named one of the five best wine books of the year by The Wall Street Journal)."
Karen Springen, Family.LifeGoesStrong.com (November 26, 2011)

"Top Wine Books: Best Wine Books Out in 2011: Last year publishers printed a tall stack of books on wine, wine and food, visiting the wine country and wine tasting notes. I don't have enough room here to review all of them for you, so I've selected four that are good reads or that ought to have a place in your reference library. Each has its pros and cons, but with each I also recommend a wine that mirrors the book's theme. Have a sip or two alongside the read; pour, then pore...THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Little, Brown & Co., $35), was the best addition to the wine-with-food literature out in 2011. Open this up: For a super-comprehensive gathering of advice, in the authors' fashion of utilizing many experts' voices, of what wines best pair up with many different foods; buckets of helpful sidebars, lists, timelines and snippets, including wine best buys. Shelve it because: Literally, shelve it. You will want to keep this — in the kitchen, not the study — as a stellar reference for your food and wine marriages."
Bill St. John, Chicago Tribune (December 7, 2011)



"More Fall Books: Some major tomes coming down the pike:
What
: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE
Who: Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg
When: November 3
Why: The husband-and-wife team are among the most highly-esteemed authors in the food world and rightly so. As with their previous books, [the authors] breezily share copious amounts of good information about food and wine. Quality-of-life improvements are guaranteed."
Charlie Suisman, ManhattanUsersGuide.com (October 4, 2011)

thesecondlunch.com

"Cookbooks of the Moment: Books by my Bedside: I read a lot of cookbooks (unsurprisingly). This is a small selection from the books stacked next to my bed right now*, and I’m still missing quite a few of my favorites. This was a very good year for cookbooks. I’m absolutely adoring all of these, and any one of them would make a fabulous holiday gift...(#2 of 12) THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg."
Samantha Tackeff, TheSecondLunch.com (December 14, 2011)


"Fall Book Preview: The fall is a fertile publishing season and I’m confident these four new wine books will likely endure for many seasons more: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Little Brown). This wine-and-food-savvy couple are the award-winning co-authors of many previous definitive guides (THE FLAVOR BIBLE, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, among others) but with FLGTW they’ve taken an interesting approach, asking star sommeliers their thoughts on topics that range from favorite grapes, regions and pairings to how and when to drink wine. Although said sommeliers are all big names in the business like John Ragan of Eleven Madison Park and Andrew Myers of CityZen in DC, the effect is remarkably down to earth, almost chatty and often fun. A piece of advice from John Ragan: "Don’t be afraid to say exactly what you are looking for. Don’t be afraid to say ‘I don’t like wine that tastes like tomatoes.’”
Lettie Teague, The Wall Street Journal (October 27, 2011)


"Gift Guide: Best Wine Books: There are hundreds of millions of wines in the world and seemingly as many types of wine books. There are texts for beginners, picture books of vineyards and wineries (and even winery dogs), innumerable guides to specific wine regions and even whole countries. There are memoirs and essays by wine importers and salesmen and critics and vast encyclopedias of every grape on the planet. There are even books that tell the history of the classification of wine. Here are my five picks of this year's varied best....The information inside THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Little, Brown, 336 pages, $35) is copious. There are timelines of memorable dates in food and wine (Chelsea Clinton's wedding is considered noteworthy as is her wine choice—Clinton Vineyards). There are calorie counts of common beverages, definitions of grape varietals and lots of insights about food and wine pairings and favorite dishes of sommeliers. The useful and interesting bits of information found in this lively reference make it suitable for wine beginners and food lovers alike."
Lettie Teague, The Wall Street Journal (November 19, 2011)

"THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE: An Essential Addition to Every Wine Lover's Library. Here’s a good idea for what to give that food and wine aficionado on your gift list:  A copy of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg.  Not only is it extremely well organized, this is also one of those rare books that’s fun to just open up randomly and allow yourself be entertained (as well as informed) by what’s on the page.  For example, I just flipped [TFLGTW] open to p.135, where my eye fell on the following quote from Hristo Zisovski, the beverage director at Manhattan’s Ai Fiori:  ' I love Chenin Blanc.  But it is not for everyone.  It is like wet wool, which can be a turnoff to some.  When you drink it you feel this thick layer of minerality on your tongue.  I happen to like minerality.'  This is an excellent description of Chenin (I like minerality too!) and it also helps me understand why some folks just aren’t keen on this particular wine...One of the charms of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is that it’s richly studded with tips, reflections, advice, and opinions from a host of influential sommeliers rather than expressing just one opinion from a critic, blogger, journalist, winemaker or other 'expert.'  You won’t agree with everything you read here, but you’ll concur that most of it makes good sense, a lot of the advice is downright practical, and some of it positively inspiring."
Marguerite Thomas, WineReviewOnline.com (December 14, 2011)

"Dean Tudor's Holiday Food Book Guide Top Gift Ideas: World Wine Watch's Dean Tudor returns with his lists of food and wine books in time for the 2011 holidays....There are so many new food and wine books out there for people who have picky tastes! What to choose? I have cast about for material and have come up with a decent selection to satisfy any pocketbook, any host, and any friend. All books and book-like materials that are listed here are RECOMMENDED...THE FOOD LOVER’S GUIDE TO WINE (Little Brown and Co., 2011, $35 US) is the latest from Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, both former wine writers for the Washington Post and other publications. They have also written THE FLAVOR BIBLE and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. Here, the basic premise is if you love food, you know flavour, and you can master wine...There is a huge section on wine types and food pairing [and] a huge resource list for websites, glossary, wine expert bios, books, and various lists. It’ll be great for wine parties as you can expound on your new knowledge."
Dean Tudor, Good Food Revolution (November 30, 2011)

"Good reads come in all forms in a banner year: The best wine books act as guides, but they may do so in markedly different ways. They might be literal guides, transporting us to another place. They might help us navigate the daunting world of food-wine pairing. They might shine a beacon on how wine is, or should be, made. Or they might just point to great bottles at reasonable prices. This year brought us superb volumes in all those areas....Still, my favorite wine book this year, the one that will end up with the most worn pages, is Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg's THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE ($35, Little, Brown & Co., 352 pages). A worthy followup to their fabulous WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, it's packed with practical and clever advice on elevating meals, making both the food and beverage taste better, whether a mundane Monday dinner or a weekend entertaining extravaganza. In other words, enhancing our lives, which is what wine, and reading about it, should be all about."
Bill Ward, Minneapolis Star Tribune (December 14, 2011)

"The best wine book I'd laid my eyes on in a very long time...THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE is a dense and detailed book that explores nearly ever facet of the food and wine pairing experience. Yet, it is exhilaratinglly accessible to those with a deep experience with wine and/or food as well as those who are just beginning to educate themselves on the subjects. The writing is engaging without a hint of pedanticism, and the reader is introduced to numerous experts who guide the reader through experiences, ideas, suggestions and opinions on all facets of food and wine's collaborative relationship. There are a few primary types of wine books: Narratives, Encyclopedias, What-To-Buy Books, Learn-About-Wine-Books and Memoir-Type volumes. Karen and Andrew have seemed to create an original combination of all these sub-genres.  The first third of the book lays the wine foundation, stressing the basics such as terroir, varieties, wine characteristics and history. There's nothing bland about this section. I've been in the wine business for over 20 years, read countless wine books and consumer wine information daily and still this first section on the basics was enlightening and entertaining. As it happens throughout the book, numerous sommeliers are used as experts on all topics. The middle portion is an intriguing encyclopedia of wine terms from grape varieties to regions to wine styles to wine categories to wine characteristics. For the majority of entries in this section the authors provide quick and easy and insightful information on a wine's color, weight, volume, sweetness, acidity, flavors, texture, best serving temperature, food pairing suggestions, age-ability and suggested producers. It's not the kind of entry you'd see in the The Oxford Companion to Wine, but rather a get-to-the-point, easy to digest kind of entry that will be very helpful. The last third of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE proceeds to examine the act of working to pair foods with wines. The subject is covered in a number of sub-categories, chapter and sidebars that once again feature the thoughts, suggestions and experiences of some of America's greatest sommeliers. This section was a very good read and most enlightening for this reader. The very last section is resource oriented with an eye toward pointing readers to other sources for continuing their eduction. This is generous. Not many wine books will provide extensive information that leads the reader away from the book or author they ar currently consuming, but it is an indication of the intent of the authors to give the reader something of substance. It should be noted that Karen and Andrew are very kind not only to other book authors and magazine publishers but also to many on-line sources of wine information. I don't know how to recommend THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE highly enough. Its $35 sticker price represents a true value. I am not going to be surprised when this volume wins numerous awards at the end of year and shows up on many 'Best Of' lists. It is currently at the top of my list."
Tom Wark, Fermentation: The Daily Wine Blog (November 2, 2011)

"Our Favorite Books: THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page with Andrew Dornenburg."
Whole Foods, via Pinterest.com (March 2012)

"Wine Lovers Gift Guide: I love books. Especially ones like this book that aims to educate and entertain at the same time. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE does that and then some, making it a reference useful for both wine beginners and foodies alike. For those buying it for the wine aspect, it is for wine consumers (not those who fancy themselves collectors). It is practical and unpretentious, two qualities not often associated with oenophiles. As for food lovers, it tells how combining the right wine with a meal can transform it from ordinary to sublime. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg of the copious information in this book. Give it as a gift this year paired with the recipient’s favorite bottle of wine."
WineImbiber.com (December 6, 2011)

THE WINE STUDENT

"One of the things I love about being a student of wine is the research. And I’m not talking about the drinking part, although that is definitely a plus. It’s the discovery of books, old and new, on the subject. And there are many out there. THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg was published in 2011 and boldly goes where many have gone before. But it does it in a way that’s accessible and fun. What I like most about this book is that it is well laid out and is written in a relaxed, conversational tone. There’s no heavy use of wine jargon (which can be confusing and off-putting if you’re not an expert in the field). And if they do use it, they make sure to explain what it means. The contributing sommeliers who offer their advice, do so to help the reader get more enjoyment out of their experience with wine. It’s an approach that’s appealing and very easy to savor."
TheWineStudent.wordpress.com (February 29, 2012)

"Holiday Wine Advice from the Authors of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE: Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg are the authors of several acclaimed food and beverage books: THE FLAVOR BIBLE, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, and CULINARY ARTISTRY. Their most recent project, which was released this fall, is called THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE. We love books that tell it like it is, and this one does. So, we asked Karen and Andrew for some major help. Could they use their mountains of expertise to help answer some of our most serious holiday beverage questions? The answer was yes (of course). We asked, they answered and we're considering the results a sort of food and wine lover's guide to the holidays: What to drink and when; what bottles to give and why. According to this perfect pair, it isn't too hard to get it right."
Anne Zimmerman, "Drinks," SeriousEats.com (December 12, 2011)


FOR MEDIA INQUIRIES or to request a review copy of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, please contact Carolyn O'Keefe at Little, Brown at carolyn.okeefe@hbgusa.com

To read the press release for THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, click here.
For a .jpg of the cover of THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE, click here.
For a B&W .jpg of the authors' headshot, click here.


culinary artistry, dining out, chef's night out, becoming a chef
The New American Chef
Best Cookbooks of 2011: We amalgamated 195 'Best Cookbooks of 2011' lists from TV, radio, newspapers, magazines, websites, blogs and booksellers across the world [which included the Chicago Tribune, Huffington Post, LA Weekly, Minneapolis Star Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, and Wall Street Journal] to come up with the definitive guide to the best books on food and drink...The #1 wine book of the year as chosen by 'best of' lists is THE FOOD LOVER'S GUIDE TO WINE by @KarenAndAndrew.
Jane Kelly, via Twitter @EatYourBooks
and EatYourBooks.com

(December 21, 2011)



 
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