Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page

What to Drink with What You Eat

The New American Chef

Becoming a Chef

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MEDIA ROOM

2006 MEDIA ROOM

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2004 MEDIA ROOM

2003 MEDIA ROOM
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"Publicity is like the air we breathe; if we have it not, we die."

—Chef and cookbook author Alexis Soyer (1810-1858),

as quoted in Becoming A Chef  (p. 8)

Andrew Dornenburg, Karen Page and Fanny Kiefer on "Studio 4"


Karen Page, Andrew Dornenburg and Matt Lauer on NBC's "Today"

“You both did a terrific job on the show.”
Andrea Smith, producer, NBC’s “Today” show (2004)

Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page have been featured extensively in the media, from the "Today" show and "Good Morning America Now" to the Food Network, from "The Leonard Lopate Show" and "Extension 720 with Milt Rosenberg" to "The Ronn Owens Show," as well as other programs nationwide.

Their books have received coverage in a wide array of publications including American Way, Avenue, Bon Appetit, The Boston Globe, Bottom Line / Personal, Business Week, Chef, Chicago Tribune, Detroit News/Free Press, eGullet.com, Entertainment Weekly, Entrepreneur, Forbes, Frequent Flyer, Gourmet, Health, Los Angeles Times, Marie Claire, Manhattan User's Guide, More, Nation's Restaurant News, New York, New York Daily News, New York Post, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, Playboy, Restaurant Hospitality, San Francisco Chronicle, The Times of India, The Week, Time Out, Town & Country, Travel + Leisure, USA Today, U.S. News & World Report, Variety, Vegetarian Times, and The Washington Post.

They are happy to be interviewed by the media on subjects related to beverages, chefs, cooking, culinary trends, flavor development, food, food and beverage pairing, menu design, restaurant criticism, restaurants, wine, and other aspects of eating and dining in America.

Andrew Dornenburg can be reached at 212.642.5870 or via email at Dornenburg@aol.comKaren Page can be reached at 212.969.0020 or via email at KarenAPage@aol.com.

Little, Brown Publicity Manager Carolyn O'Keefe can be reached re: scheduling an interview with the authors and/or obtaining a review copy of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT at 212.364.1464 or via email at carolyn.okeefe@hbgusa.com.


2007 MEDIA HIGHLIGHTS

"This week, it's all about sparking wine. Biggest surprise is the number of mentions and favor shown to Lucien Albrecht Cremant d'Alsace. Segura Viudas most often gets the nod for Cava, while Roederer Estate leads California recommendations (followed closely by Schramsberg). And no single major Champagne house rises to the top, with Veuve Clicquot hardly mentioned at all this year. Whatever fills your glass on New Year's Eve, may your New Year be bright and joyous...Washington Post: Wine writers Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg on sparkling wines for all dinner courses. Nice comments on offerings from 1+ 1 = 3, Zonin, Domaine Ste. Michelle, Kluge, Domaine Carneros, Roederer Estate, Laurent-Perrier, Schramsberg, Taittinger, and several from Perrier-Jouet."
John Gillespie, Wine Review Weekly (December 31, 2007)

Wine News Review

"Consumers are smartening up and getting more kicks from champagne bargains...If you really can’t get enough of the stuff, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg at The Washington Post offer some decadently tantalizing instructions on how to have A Sparkling Toast for Every Course."
Sam Meddis, Wine News Review (December 29, 2007)


Michael Aaron, Leonard Lopate,
and Karen Page at WNYC Radio

"Bubbly is most people's favorite drink on New Year's Eve, and since the celebration is only three days away, we've decided to devote today's 'Please Explain' to Champagne and other sparkling wines. Joining me now are Michael Aaron, chairman of Sherry-Lehmann, the legendary Park Avenue wine and spirits store, and Karen Page, the James Beard Award-winning author with her husband Andrew Dornenburg of numerous books including most recently WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT; it's published by Hachette. It is my great pleasure to welcome both of them."
Leonard Lopate, "The Leonard Lopate Show," WNYC Radio (December 28, 2007)

"Highlights from the Latest Show....VIDEO: Go Global for New Year's Bubbly. Part Three of our Countdown to 2008 series....We're back with Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. Of course, they are the connoisseurs of carbonation. They also write a column for The Washington Post., and they also have a book: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT."
Bianna Golodryga, "Good Morning America Now," ABC News (December 28, 2007)

"Highlights from the Latest Show....VIDEO: Delicious Domestic Sparklers. Part Two of our Countdown to 2008 series: Sparkling wines from across America....Once again, we're joined by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. Of course, they're the wine sages who write a column for The Washington Post. They also have a book out called WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT."
Bianna Golodryga, "Good Morning America Now," ABC News (December 27, 2007)

"Highlights from the Latest Show....VIDEO: What to Eat With Your Bubbly. Part One of our Countdown to 2008 series: Pairing sparkling wine with food...Experts: Washington Post columnists and co-authors of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page."
"Good Morning America Now," ABC News (December 26, 2007)

Credit: Julia Ewan

"A Sparkling Toast for Every Course."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (December 26, 2007) and Erie Times-News (December 28, 2007)

"With the holidays rapidly approaching it is time to find that awe-inspiring gift for the wine lover on your list....I have searched around for what I think are some of the best gift ideas for all kinds of wine lovers. Here are some of my favorites: For the Wine Bookworm: If your wine lover devours every wine book released or you know someone who loves experimenting with food and wine pairing this is the gift. Food and wine pairing is a complex topic and can take years to master, unless you let the experts do the work for you. Since you probably don't want to hire your own personal sommelier I have found an easier way: read WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food With Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea Even WaterBased on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers, written by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. This couple is well respected in the restaurant industry having written a number of culinary books including CULINARY ARTISTRY that are invaluable to chefs and foodies alike. Now they have decided to tackle beverages. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT is the most comprehensive guide to matching food and drink that I have seen. The book has useful advice from America's top chefs, sommeliers and wine experts. You'll find out how to stock your home with the essential beverages, ranging from beer, spirits and of course wines. The last half of the book is a reference guide where you can look up either the dish you are creating or the wine you want to drink to find its perfect match. This book will save you time and money by helping you create great pairings that enhance every meal."
Laurie Forster, wine columnist, What's Up Annapolis magazine (December 2007)

Wine News Review

"The ultimate guide to holiday wines, featuring top bargains from top experts: Holidays were made for wine. Or is it the other way ’round? One thing we can all agree on, though, is that picking the right wine during this festive season is essential....If you’re up for some even pricier numbers for your celebrations, two favorite reviewers, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg at The Washington Post, serve up Just the Stuff for Roasts and Reveling. Most of the picks are $40 and up, although there a couple in the $20s. As Page and Dornenburg say, 'It’s the perfect time to raise a toast to the roast — and to splurge a little.' In other words, this is the season to perhaps let the Wine News Review fairly frugal affordability index hibernate."
Sam Meddis, Wine News Review (December 22, 2007)

"A buffet of books to get you through the winter: This week's book buffet is food-related several kitchen-help books and a bunch of new cookbooks have found their way onto the shelves at the Juneau Public Libraries (and hopefully, soon into your kitchen)....CULINARY ARTISTRY by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. Like the star chef in 'Ratatouille,' some people just seem to 'know' what dishes need. Here's your chance to get in on the secret, too. This book is full of flavor and food pairings and tips on composing dishes for taste and texture. Read this straight through or use it as a reference to find out what seasonings to match with your fresh carrots or halibut. Discover which 10 ingredients notable chefs such as Rick Bayless and Alice Waters wouldn't want to be without. Find out which flavors characterize the world's dishes. While not a cookbook per se, some recipes are included, but mostly this is a kick start for cooks ready to venture off the recipe cards and into their own creations."
Kathy Ward, Juneau Empire (December 21, 2007)

"...Good Morning America [Now] will air segments on sparkling wines and what to pair with them and feature WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Little, Brown, $35, 9780821257180/0821257188)."
John Mutter, Shelf Awareness (December 21, 2007)

"Last-Minute Gift Ideas: Feeling Bookish. It's down to the shopping wire for this year's holidays. If you're still scratching your head for gift ideas, here's a list of books we love that are available for quick shipping from Amazon.com or in any Barnes & Noble bookstore: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: A veritable encyclopedic reference for wine, beer, spirits, coffee, tea, and food. See a sampling of 5 perfect pairs in our Sept/Oct 2007 [issue]."
Imbibe magazine (December 21, 2007)

"Just the Stuff for Roasts and Reveling."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (December 19, 2007) and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (December 20, 2007)

"Daniel Johnnes, beverage director of Daniel in New York City, offered the following advice in WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page: 'Look for producers who are tried and true. They may be wines you have previously tasted and enjoyed, or you can ask sommeliers and wine merchants, or read reviews in various publications. Equate a Burgundy to another crafted product like a handmade pair of shoes. Look for the name of the producer....When they put their name on the bottle, they're very proud.'"
Bill Daley, The Chicago Tribune (December 19, 2007)

"Gifts that are good for the tastebuds....Cookbooks make great gifts, as much for the good things that can come from them as the inspiration they provide for home cooks. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page: (Bulfinch Press, $35). Winner of the 2007 Cookbook of the Year from the International Association of Culinary Professionals. The authors have written an exhaustive guide to pairing food with wine, beer, spirits, coffee, tea and water."
Janet K. Keeler, Chris Sherman and Laura Reiley, The St. Petersburg Times (December 19, 2007) and The Merced Sun-Star (December 19, 2007)

"The 75 Top-Selling Wine Books: 1) Windows on the World Complete Wine Course; 2) The World Atlas of Wine; 3) The Wine Bible; 4) WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT; 5) The Oxford Companion to Wine...."
VeryWellSaid.com/wine (December 15, 2007)

add an egg

"Holiday Cookbook Round-Up. The holiday season is upon us once again, and as always we may be looking for a gift for someone special...All are books that I value in some particular manner and feel are worthy purchases. Hopefully, you'll agree with me and if you give any as gifts, hopefully, those who receive will find some pleasure in their gift and also come away as a more informed, intelligent cook or food lover....WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page: A simple to understand, very in-depth look at the whole rigmarole surrounding pairing food with alcohol and other liquids including water. If you have any interest in this, then get it. Enough said."
AddAnEgg.com (December 14, 2007)

"Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg of The Washington Post are all about the double happiness of the wine-cheese pairing this week . They put it so well, we'll quote them: 'Just as grapes achieve their gastronomic zenith as wine, milk reaches its own as cheese. Tasting wine and cheese together provides double the opportunities to contemplate the delicious wonders of fermentation.' This is a great and valuable guide for cheese beginners. Their suggestions: cheddar with Chardonnay, chevre with Sancerre, muenster with Gewurztraminer, and more."
Lauren Schulz, CorkAndKnife.com (December 14, 2007)

Photo credit: Julia Ewan

"With a Chunk of Cheese, Pour These."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (December 12, 2007), The Monterey County Herald (February 6, 2008), The Oregonian (January 8, 2008), and The (Amsterdam, NY) Recorder

I n s a t i a b l e__C r i t i c

"Now I devour cookbooks as sensuous pleasure. Okay, food porn. Why not?  My holiday gifts list books you might buy for someone who already has too many cookbooks but is hopelessly addicted. Many have recipes one might actually want to try should the urge itch. One or two insist on being read. I find big cookbooks make nice side tables. A few favorite food books must be kept in the bathroom just in case you get locked in.  You can also stuff books you love under the springs of your bed and you’ll never need worry about the bed caving in. If I were to die as the Collier brothers did when a pile of books topples and crushes me underneath…is that really so sad?  In no significant order (I don’t alphabetize my spices either): INSATIABLE: Tales from a Life of Delicious Excess, by Yours Truly (Warner Books) $13.99.  Audio $24.98.  The vicarious cook and gourmand must have this book, if I say so myself.  WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Bulfinch Press) $35.  When you want only the most perfect pairing of food and drink, my passionately dedicated pals Andrew and Karen have done the tasting and queried the experts for you. What to sip  with everything from aioli to zucchini blossoms and why...And what to eat with everything from Aglianico and Ale to Zinfandel, it’s all covered in this handsomely designed volume that won IACP 'best food book of the year.'”
Gael Greene, Insatiable-Critic.com (December 9, 2007)

"2007 Holiday Shopping Guide....While not focused solely on Long Island, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page is an indispensable resource in my kitchen. No book does a better job helping you pair food with wine, beer, even soda and vice versa. And, look closely and you'll see Channing Daughters Winery scenes featured throughout."
Lenn Thompson, Hamptons Online (December 2007)

"How to Stock a Bar for Your Holiday Party... Trade in champagne for sparkling wine to cut costs, or go for artisanal beers. "They give you lots of flavor bang for the buck, and taste great with beer-friendly foods like fondue or sausages,' says Karen Page, co-author of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT...'Think about a theme that unites you,' says Page. 'If you traveled to France together, re-create the moment by serving a selection of French wines and matched French cheeses.' If you're all from the same area, consider serving a selection from that state's winery. 'As of 2002, there are now wineries in all 50 states, so you could serve a wine from the state you're from,' adds Page....Boss coming over? Not a good time to experiment with mixing drinks. Stick to what you know. If there's something that bonds you, play it up with your choice of what you serve. 'Let's say you finished a big project for Tropicana at work. Make a pitcher of a cocktail with orange juice,' says Page. Don't have anything that quite bonds you like that yet? If you're a little more adventurous and know your VIP's favorite ingredients, invent a cocktail named in his/her honor (hey, a little sucking up never hurt)....If you're not sure exactly what the crowd will be like, Page suggests chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon. 'It's a safe option, but if you want to encourage others to enjoy new experiences, serve an obscure white and red from Spain that they may have never tasted — take them somewhere!'...You might have pregnant guests or people who simply don't drink. Don't leave them out! Mocktails let your guests enjoy their nonalcoholic drink, and are easy to make. If you don't have time to make them yourself, Page suggests buying Fizzy Lizzy drinks — fruit juice and seltzer-water mixed drinks. Add a little vodka, and 'voilà! You have a Dizzy Lizzy cocktail.'"
Shyema Azam, Marie Claire (December 2007)

"'Dry versions of rose go beautifully with pink foods,' says Karen Page author with Andrew Dornenburg of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT 'salmon, tuna, even things like lobster, bouillebaise, pork.' If you really want to get ahead of the curve think red; sparkling shiraz is beginning to emerge on U.S. store shelves. 'It's very flexible with lots of different foods,' says Page. She likes sparkling shiraz for holiday dinners where lots of different entrees and wacky side dishes may appear. 'Sparkling shiraz is a wine that can pair up to lots of different flavors.'...Types of champagne and sparkling wine and food pairing suggestions from Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, authors of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT...."
Michelle Locke, The Associated Press (December 7, 2007), Akron Beacon Journal, Asbury Park Press, Atlanta Journal-Constitution (December 10, 2007), Belleville News Democrat, Cherry Hill (NJ) Courier Post, Chicago Daily Herald, Corpus Christi (TX) Caller-Times, (West Chester, PA) Daily Local News, The (Batavia, NY) Daily News, The (Charleston, WV) Daily Mail, The (Milford, MA) Daily News, The Daily News of Newburyport, The (Norwood, MA) Daily News Transcript, The Grand Island (NE) Independent, The Maryland Gazette, Maryville (TN) Daily Times, The (MI) Morning Sun (December 12, 2007), MSNBC.com, The (MN) Post-Bulletin, North County Times, Northwest Indiana Times, Philadelphia Daily News, (Rochester, MN) Post-Bulletin, San Angelo (TX) Standard Times, San Mateo Daily Journal (December 12, 2007), Sioux Falls (SD) Argus Leader, St. Paul Pioneer Press (December 20, 2007), Tuscaloosa News, Ventura County (CA) Star, Waterbury (CT) Republican American, Winston-Salem Journal, and WRAL.com

"Wines to Pair with the Flavors of Asia."
Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, The Miami Herald (December 6, 2007)

Photo credit: Julia Ewan

"Perfect Presents to Keep Under Wraps."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (December 5, 2007), Monterey County Herald (December 5, 2007) and The (North Jersey) Record (December 19, 2007)

"101 Gift Ideas....For the Drinker: 29. Reference books. Oxford Companion to Wine by Jancis Robinson; The World Atlas of Wine by Hugh Johnson and Jancis Robinson; WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg, Karen Page, and Michael Sofronski [photographer]; Making Sense of Wine by Matt Kramer; The Brewmaster's Table by Garrett Oliver."
Alexandra Stafford, The (Philadelphia) Bulletin
(November 30, 2007)

"Don't Party Like It's 1982. Who has time to make canapes and polish crystal stemware? Let's keep hosting as easy as possible. Unless you're P. Diddy, the only booze you need for a kick-ass party is vodka, rum, whiskey, wine, and beer. For mixers, make sure to have cranberry juice, club soda, Coke, tonic water, and lots of lemons....Now, how much to buy? Rule of thumb: Plan on two drinks per person [per hour] for the first two hours, one drink per person for each extra hour, says entertaining guru Karen Page."
Shyema Azam, Marie Claire
(December 2007)

Credit: Bill O'Leary

"Holiday Pours Priced to Please Even Scrooges."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (November 28, 2007), www.NorthJersey.com, and The (OR) Mail Tribune (December 5, 2007), Monterey County Herald (December 5, 2007) and the White Plains Journal News (December 12, 2007)

"For Christmas this year in my family we're all buying each other books and giving some bucks to a favorite charity designated by the giftee; Teen Daughter Avalon excepted — she wants a new guitar. She's getting a book too, but it's not likely to be a book related to cookery, which is what everyone else is getting because 2007 has been a good year for cookbooks and food related tomes....Thanksgiving this year was confusing as far as wine pairings go — it used to be turkey with Riesling, now it's Zin or Pinot Noir but if you get WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, you're getting a great guide to pairing food with wine, beer, spirits and even coffee, tea and water."
Rachel Forrest, Portsmouth Herald (November 28, 2007)

WILF'S WINE PRESS

"Much has been written these past few weeks about what wine to drink with your Thanksgiving turkey. Now that the entertaining season is here, I am sure we will see lots more on the subject of food and wine matching. WHAT to DRINK with WHAT you EAT is a great source of information and is a must-have if you are interested in food and wine matching."
Wilf Krutzmann, DVM, CSW, Wilf's Wine Press (November 26, 2007)

"WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg (sic)...WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT is the ideal gift for the person interested in pairing food and wine and who wants to go beyond the advice of 'red wine with red meat and white wine with white meats.' This easy to use book is the best we've seen on choosing the best wine to enhance the flavors of a meal...This amazing book makes it easy to choose which wine should go with a meal. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT is recommended by top chefs, culinary schools, and sommeliers. A definite 'must have' for wine drinkers everywhere, this book is the perfect resource. The book is designed so that you can quickly skim to find learn which wine goes best with meal you are planning. You will be able to purchase your wine with confidence based on the information from this comprehensive book. Learn more about wine and food pairing with a book that is sure to delight."
Steve and Kathy Howe, Cheers2Wine.com (November 25, 2007)

V I N O G R A P H Y : a wine blog

"If you have ever anguished over what to serve with your perfectly poached salmon, or what to prepare for your dinner guests toting wines they brought back from South Africa, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg have advice for you. 2007 International Association of Culinary Professionals 'book of the year' winner WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The definitive guide to pairing food with wine, beer, spirits, coffee, tea — even water — based on expert advice from America’s best sommeliers is the current sine qua non of wine and food pairing, with 230 pages listing over 1500 pairing suggestions in two chapters — one starting with the food and the second with the beverage. The book opens by explaining how and why a great pairing can create a life-altering experience....The book gets its life blood from the quotes and musings of over 70 chefs, sommeliers, and other wine, food, and beverage-savvy folks....A smattering of photographs (my favorite is the Junior’s cheesecake coupled with a bottle of Quady Essensia), occasional recipes, and lots of illustrative stories and examples make real what could be at once an overly philosophical and technical volume....For the voyeur, WHAT TO DRINK offers an approachable and entertaining look inside the minds of restaurateurs, sommeliers, and other beverage professionals. The stories of how esteemed sommeliers learned to distinguish one wine from another in their vast world is in itself fascinating. And it is enlightening to learn how they look upon us when we sit down in their restaurant and ask for a wine suggestion."
Jennie Schacht, Vinography.com (November 23, 2007)

"The Buzz: On November 16, hundreds of New York’s most powerful and influential women from the worlds of business, media, government, publishing and the arts gathered at the Rainbow Room for the Citymeals-on-Wheels 21st annual 'Power Lunch for Women' emceed by Deborah Roberts, correspondent on ABC’s '20/20.' The annual benefit raised enough money to provide 160,000 meals for New York’s frail homebound elderly....Among this year’s lunching ladies were...Karen Page, Jill Eikenberry, Adrienne Landau."
Panache magazine (November 2007)


K. Page, J. Eikenberry, A. Landau

"....Last Friday at the Rainbow Room, [Gael Greene and Citymeals-on-Wheels] held their annual Women's Power Lunch which brings out hundreds of New York's most prominent women. I'm talking about women of influence and often business and philanthropy. The press often includes the word 'powerful' to describe these women. The main source of that power is imagination and energy...Among this year's lunching ladies were Christine Baranski; Polly Bergen; Samantha Boardman; Mary Higgins Clark; Carmen Dell'Orefice; Michele Oka Doner; Edie Falco; Geraldine Ferraro; Linda Fiorentino; Nina Garcia; Betsy Gotbaum; Gael Greene; Donna Hanover; Caroline Hirsch; Liz Lange; Stephanie March; Liz Smith; Elaine Stritch; Diana Taylor; Kathleen Turner; Diane von Furstenberg; Silda Wall Spitzer...Karen Page, Jill Eikenberry, Adrienne Landau...."
David Patrick Columbia, New York Social Diary (November 19, 2007)

"Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page have created a whole new genre for books about food and wine. Rather than present their own recipes or express their personal opinions, they've compiled those of a wide variety of authorities in the field in such a way as to make them indispensable to culinary professionals and enthusiasts alike. Their new book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, is perhaps the most compelling of their several titles, because it attacks the continuous dilemma of pairing food and beverage. Yes, this is a book of lists, but what lists! Used aggressively by restaurateurs, it has the potential to put a lot of us food and wine consultants out of business. If you have this book, you can confidently teach yourself the tricks of the trade. This is, however, not just a book about what wine to drink. It goes far deeper than that, by including pairings with spirits, beer and all manner of non-alcoholic beverages, including milk and water. There is truly something here for everyone. It would make a wonderful holiday gift for your favorite host or hostess."
June Jacobs, Feastivals.com (November 19, 2007)

Wine News Review

"Need Help Picking A Thanksgiving Wine? These Top Experts Make It Easy....You haven't yet decided what Thanksgiving wine to serve. Or you're unsure about the selections you've made. And time is short. The anxiety! At The Washington Post, wine writers Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg know full well the pressures we're under choosing wines for this annual feast. 'Even avid wine lovers can be struck with a temporary case of oenophobia — fear of wine — around Thanksgiving,' they say, with the wisdom of being award-winning wine authors. 'The prospect of choosing a bottle that will please all of your guests and complement all of your dishes can perplex the most confident holiday host.' But don't despair. There's a rich bounty of tips and picks across the Web, just waiting to be harvested. Page and Dornenburg, for example, serve up a batch of ideas 'to help calm any oenophobic tendencies.' Among their several selections, a couple that caught my eye were the Australian sparkling Shiraz 'bursting with berries and bubbles' and the Napa Valley Merlot that's sure to come alive 'with impressive blackberry and tart cherry flavors'....And the best advice of all comes from Page and Dornenburg: 'After all is said and done, don't sweat it. Thanksgiving ultimately is not about the wine, but about being grateful for the love of those you're with.' Let's drink to that."
Sam Meddis, Wine News Review (November 19, 2007)

"How to Bring Wine to a Party. It's a look wine shop clerks know well. That overwhelmed, glassy-eyed stare that afflicts people as they wade through aisle after aisle of wine in search of the right bottle to bring to a party. But arming yourself with a little advice and doing a bit of planning can make it easy to break out of the wine shop stupor and get the right wine for the right event for the right price....'We think you should really be driven by the type of food being served,' says Karen Page, co-author of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. 'If you don't know what the food is, go for bubbles or rose.' Other good, all-purpose, food-friendly options are rieslings and pinot noirs, she says. 'Riesling is the single most food-friendly white wine there is,' she says. This low-alcohol wine has a hint of sweetness and goes well with spicy cuisines, such as Indian, as well as Asian foods...."
Tanya Bricking Leach, Associated Press (November 16, 2007), Akron (OH) Beacon Journal (December 17, 2007), Asbury Park Press (December 17, 2007), Athens Banner-Herald (December 4, 2007), The (Charleston, WV) Daily Mail (November 21, 2007), The Columbia (MO) Daily Tribune (November 28, 2007), The (CA) Daily Breeze (November 28, 2007), The (Everett, WA) Daily Herald (December 9, 2007), The (Newburyport, MA) Daily News, The (MA) Eagle Tribune, The Eureka (CA) Reporter (November 17, 2007), The Evansville (IN) Courier & Press, The (FL) Ledger, The Gloucester Daily Times, The Hartford Courant, The Helena (MT) Independent Record, The Jackson (MS) Clarion Ledger, The Kane County (IL) Chronicle, The Lubbock (TX) Avalanche Journal, The (MT) Missoulian, The Northwest (IL) Herald, The Oklahoman, The Orange County Register (December 9, 2007), The Orlando Sentinel (November 28, 2007), The (MA) Salem News, Savannah (GA) Morning News, Springfield (IL) State Journal Register,The (ME) Sun Journal (November 19, 2007), and Wilkes Barre (PA) Times-Leader (December 5, 2007)

"The wait is over! Beaujolais Nouveau has arrived! Quote from The Washington Post, by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg: 'Because Beaujolais Nouveau is released annually on the third Thursday of November exactly one week before Thanksgiving the two have become as inextricably linked as Champagne and New Year's Eve. Tomorrow, you can proclaim 'Le Beaujolais Nouveau est arrive' just in time to serve as a classic and reasonably priced (the 2007 Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Nouveau is $10) accompaniment to Thanksgiving dinner, plus any buttery cheeses such as brie or Camembert that you might set out before or after the meal.' (November 14, 2007)"
WineWithoutRules.com (November 15, 2007)


For the Thanksgiving table, an assortment of wine options
(Photo credit: Julia Ewan)

"With These Strategies, Pick Your Pour."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (November 14, 2007) and The St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"Don't Party Like It's 1982. Who has time to make canapes and polish crystal stemware? Let's keep hosting as easy as possible. Unless you're P. Diddy, the only booze you need for a kick-ass party is vodka, rum, whiskey, wine, and beer. For mixers, make sure to have cranberry juice, club soda, Coke, tonic water, and lots of lemons....Now, how much to buy? Rule of thumb: Plan on two drinks per person [per hour] for the first two hours, one drink per person for each extra hour, says entertaining guru Karen Page."
Shyema Azam, Marie Claire
(December 2007)

"'Adding sage to a dish can help to make it more red wine friendly, especially with lighter and/or fruitier reds like Merlot, Pinot Noir, and Syrah/Shiraz,' say Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, authors of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. This is a big plus when serving cooked tomato and onion/garlic-based items that can be too acidic or pungent for certain wines."
Peggy Myers Walz, Vegetarian Times
(November / December 2007)

Credit: Bill O'leary
Matches made in heaven: chocolate with wine

"Chocolate and Wine, Sweet on Each Other."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (November 7, 2007), The Connecticut Post (November 13, 2007), Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (November 7, 2007), and Santa Rosa Press Democrat (December 5, 2007)

"OYSTERS' PARTNERS: For Old Ebbitt's Grill's 12th Annual Oyster Riot on Nov. 16 and Nov. 17, judges selected two New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs as this year's top three wines for oyster pairings in a blind taste test. In first place is the Kim Crawford 2007 Sauvignon Blanc, second is the bubbly Korbel Champagne Cellars "Natural" NV from Russian River Valley in California, and the third-place wine is a 2007 Seifried Sauvignon Blanc. Judges included Washington Post columnists and authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, chef Jose Andres, former Washington Post food critic Phyllis Richman, Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia and this writer. Four hundred twenty wines were entered in this year's competition. Judges chose from the staff's top 20 favorites."
Melissa McCart, "Express," The Washington Post (November 7, 2007)

"Words of inspiration: “I’m really happy with how my [first] cookbook—Small Bites, Big Nights—turned out. The photography is so great that it inspires readers to try the recipes. I personally love a book called CULINARY ARTISTRY by Andrew Dornenberg and Karen Page. Although it’s not really a cookbook, it’s so interesting. They put a bunch of leading chefs together and had them pair up ingredients, vegetables, sauces and meats in different ways. It’s just a great reference book to get your brain clicking—a good way to jump-start things.”
Govind Armstrong, chef, as quoted in
Ocean Drive Magazine (November 2007)

S A V O R_ I T

"...The textbook we're reading for this course [at Portland's Western Culinary Institute] is very cool. It's titled THE NEW AMERICAN CHEF: Cooking with the Best of Flavors and Techniques from Around the World. I highly recommend it for any cook interested in international cuisine. Each country has its own chapter and the body of them are filled with a bit of history, culture, and tradition with the country's cuisine. The authors, Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, also interviewed well-respected chefs for each specialized cuisine on their thoughts, experiences, and tips for each part of the world. And, of course, lots of recipes are included as well."
Savor It (October 31, 2007)

"The newest cooking trend: Celebrity chef backlash: Aren't Canadians supposed to be the nice ones? From Susan Schwartz, writer for Montreal newspaper The Gazette:

...Today, a coffee table book like My Last Supper: 50 Great Chefs and Their Final Meals (Bloomsbury, $49.95) creates all kinds of buzz and gets spreads in magazines and newspapers all over North America, even though it's in large measure a pretentious and banal work....But there are way better books out there, books in which chefs write thoughtfully about what they do, about food and cooking books like How I Learned to Cook (Bloomsbury, $17.95, 2007), a fine anthology edited by Kimberly Witherspoon with contributions from the likes of Marcella Hazan and David Chang, or BECOMING A CHEF (John Wiley & Sons, $35.99, 2003) by Andrew Dornenberg and Karen Page."

Variety.com (October 29, 2007)

"When Anthony Bourdain began to cook for a living in the 1970s it was, he said flat out, 'a loser profession.' Okay, so he was exaggerating when he said cooking was something you did between jobs or criminal convictions, but Bourdain, who was catapulted to celebrity when he wrote a tell-all memoir about life in a restaurant kitchen, is nothing if not outrageous. Today, he says, cooking is 'a glamour profession.' Today, chefs can be stars. Celebrities. Not all of them, obviously, but there are chefs who go on talk shows and have their own brand of olive oil or cookware, who have their own television programs all because they are celebrities. Bourdain himself is host of the Travel Channel television series 'No Reservations,' in which he and his crew travel the world in search of adventure and memorable meals. Today, a coffee table book like My Last Supper: 50 Great Chefs and Their Final Meals (Bloomsbury, $49.95) creates all kinds of buzz and gets spreads in magazines and newspapers all over North America, even though it's in large measure a pretentious and banal work, to my mind, one full of contrived photographs of chefs including one, incidentally, of Bourdain, nude, holding a strategically placed bone....I'm sure the book will do well. So will Bourdain's. But there are way better books out there, books in which chefs write thoughtfully about what they do, about food and cooking books like How I Learned to Cook (Bloomsbury, $17.95, 2007), a fine anthology edited by Kimberly Witherspoon with contributions from the likes of Marcella Hazan and David Chang, or BECOMING A CHEF (John Wiley & Sons, $35.99, 2003) by Andrew Dornenberg and Karen Page. It features recipes, too. I believe people care about what they eat, that many of us feel strongly about the magic of being in the kitchen. I just don't get what people think they'll learn from celebrity chefs."
Susan Schwartz, Montreal Gazette (October 29, 2007)

Wine News Review

"...An estimated 3 to 5 percent of cork-sealed wines go bad, and the blame often unfairly goes to the winery rather than, say, bad handling on the way to the shop or restaurant. Here’s a Washington Post behind-the-scenes glimpse by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg at the extent to which wineries are trying to fight back. With some wine recommendations thrown in."
Sam Meddis, Wine News Review (October 28, 2007)

gourmet file: a cook's guide to the web

"...And finally, another book recommendation: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food wiht Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea Even Water Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. This is the ultimate reference book for matching food and beverages. It features two indexes so that you can look up pairing suggestions according to food or drink."
Beverly Brown, GourmetFile.com (October 2007)

"Cookbooks & More: The fourth selection here is essential in another way. I am not a great wine drinker, and as such, am always flummoxed when asked what wine to pair with what food...So when I read a review of this new book by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page called WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, I was excited and ordered it from Amazon for May delivery when we were in NY. It is excellent....comprehensive and easy to use. For Szechuan food, for instance, the book suggests Beaujolais, beer or Riesling or Gewurztraminer....The book is extremely well organized and one can look up a particular wine to find what foods go best with it. For example, for a Sauternes (French White Dessert Wine from Bordeaux), they suggest Almonds and Almond desserts, Custards, etc. This is another must-have for a good cookbook/food book library. List price $35, and worth every penny."
MarketManila.com (October 25, 2007)

Credit: Gerald Martineau
Craggy Range at Legal Sea Foods

"In Pursuit of Paradise Lost."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (October 24, 2007) and NorthJersey.com (November 7, 2007)

"Affordable Weeknight Wonders."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (October 17, 2007), Ashland Daily Tidings (October 23, 2007), Miami Herald (January 10, 2008), Raleigh News & Observer (October 23, 2007), Recorder News and San Luis Obispo Tribune (November 9, 2007)



Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page's Blog at BecomingAChef.com is named one of "The Fifty Best Links for Epicureans."
The Fifty Best Links for Epicureans
(October 23, 2007)

Wine News Review

"Experts' Picks....Churchill's Tawny Porto 10 Years Old:
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg — 'aged tawny ports trumpet their maturity on their labels as badges of honor,' but here's one for 'those of us looking for the biggest bang for our bucks.' $29."
Sam Meddis, Wine News Review (October 12, 2007)

"...Choosing which beer to drink may have been easier back then, but now it's much more fun....The sheer variety of beer now available makes it easier than ever to pair food with the perfect brew. Busch Gardens, San Diego, has a tasting room that allows drinkers to pair a selection of beers with fruit, cheese and chocolate. And Karen Page, co-author of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, suggests going even further by experimenting with different beers for every meal. "Beverages have huge implications for the flavor of the dish you're eating," says Page, who suggests pairing a hearty, smoky beer with a smoky dish such as German sausage, or a light fruit beer, such as cherry or [rasp]berry, to go with a piece of cheesecake or chocolate cake. "We have a theory that when customers send dishes back to the kitchen and the kitchen can't find anything wrong with them, it's because the customer ordered the wrong beverage and the dish tastes funny in their mouth."
Sara Pierce, Entrepreneur magazine (October 11, 2007) and MSNBC.com (October 15, 2007)

"Royers pies, made famous at the cafe in Round Top, got a great plug this week in an unlikely place: a Washington Post wine column by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg. Page and Dornenburg were encouraging the pairing of port wine and autumn pies when they noted, 'After spying the first bright-orange pumpkins of fall, we craved pumpkin pie so intensely that we mail-ordered the only version we've ever loved: the pie from Royers Round Top Cafe in Round Top…' They also ordered a pecan pie and a chocolate chip pie. Now I'm pondering what port to have with Royers strawberry-rhubarb, my favorite."
Dale Rice, restaurant critic and wine writer, Austin American-Statesman (October 11, 2007)

Photo: Kevin Clark
Tawny port at Zola in DC

"Not Just Any Old Port."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (October 10, 2007), Herald News (October 24, 2007), Miami Herald (October 25, 2007) and The Record (October 24, 2007)

"Wine drinkers are growing increasingly bullish for Spanish wines of all types, including the distinctive tinto de Toro reds. These wines made from the tempranillo grape are named for a town on the Duero River in the province of Zamora, northwest of Madrid. The appellation is small in size, but the area is standing increasingly tall in the international market....What to serve with tinto de Toro? Seger recommends grilled or heartier foods. Jeffirs goes for steaks or game. Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, authors of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, also suggest duck, lamb chops and roast chicken."
Bill Daley, The Chicago Tribune (October 10, 2007), Knight Ridder News Service (October 10, 2007), Idaho Statesman (October 31, 2007), Orlando Sentinel (October 17, 2007), Stamford Times (October 24, 2007), and Wilton Villager (October 25, 2007)

"Best Brainstorming Book. As I am brainstorming new menu items for the fall dessert menu at Emeril’s Delmonico, I have yet again pulled my trusty old copy of CULINARY ARTISTRY from my bookshelves. This book has been an inspiration to me since its publication in 1996. My copy of CULINARY ARTISTRY was given to me by a dear friend in the beginning of my culinary career; it is signed, 'Cook, Eat, Share, Live!!' by the authors (Dornenburg and Page). I have yet to stop following their advice. It isn’t their advice that is most inspiring for me, but the content of the book itself. It is jam-packed (pun intended?!), with many menu items from famous chefs, flavor combination indexes for every ingredient imaginable, anecdotes from chefs on signature dish item composition, theories on flavor pairings, and even biographies on many of the contributing chefs. I use it to jog my brain for new ideas and to help me think outside of the box when pairing different flavors. Many times, I find myself coming up with flavor combinations that are not listed in the book; I like to jot my ideas down in the book’s index for future reference. CULINARY ARTISTRY is an essential guide for any professional chef, and a wealth of knowledge for any aspiring chef or home gourmet. Of all the cookbooks I own, this is the one that I reference most. I hope you find it as stimulating and enjoyable as I have over the years!"
Jenny McCoy, pastry chef, Emeril's Delmonico in New Orleans on Emerils.com (October 5, 2007)

"The return of the cocktail: Mixed drinks with dinner is the newest trend....Those days are back, with the attention on flavorful cocktails largely fueled by the flux of infused liquors and the growth of mixologists. A mixologist, of course, is a master bartender: They know liquor much in the same way a sommelier knows wine. Fine restaurants are joining that trend in some cases hiring mixologists specifically to help customers match cocktails with food. 'It's a huge trend. It's interesting because I don't think it's necessarily cannibalizing wine consumption, because it's up as well. But people right now are so engaged with beverages across the board,' says Karen Page, coauthor of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bulfinch/Little Brown, $35). 'This whole love that we've developed for food over the last decade with the Food Network and the rise of the celebrity chef is naturally evolving into a love of food and drink.'...Page, whose book captured the Cookbook of the Year award by the International Association of Culinary Professionals earlier this year, likens the mixed cocktail to a side sauce with extra kick. Naturally, for example, lemon-based cocktails pair well with seafood dishes. When you're eating seafood, it's often served with a side of the citrus so people can squeeze the flavor onto it. 'The drink almost becomes the sauce that finishes the dish. In your mouth, you're tasting them together, the way you would taste the sauce splashed on the dish,' Page says."
Kelley L. Carter, The Detroit Free Press (October 4, 2007)

Photo: Kevin Clark

"Paging Through An Italian Idyll."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (October 3, 2007), Raleigh News-Observer (October 10, 2007), and Recorder News (October 12, 2007)

"Following the rules helps in choosing What to Drink with What You Eat. Reading WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT will let you transform every dinner from ordinary to extraordinary. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Bulfinch, $35). Many studies rank choosing the perfect wine to serve with a particular food to be as stressful as the first day on a new job. Instead, according to authors Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, husband and wife since 1990, choosing the right wine is something that should be more of a cause for joy. Even a quick glance at WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bulfinch, $35), shows you how off-base such fears are. In easy-to-understand prose, the couple, authors of previous best-sellers BECOMING A CHEF and CULINARY ARTISTRY, explain the ins and outs of the process, which in the end is much more art than science....Although food can dominate wine when pairing and vice versa, the best outcome, of course, say the authors and the experts they quote, is that the food improves the wine and the wine improves the food....Along the way, the couple interview the country's top chefs and highlight their tasting menus as examples....Dorenburg and Page point out that it's both a blessing and a curse for food and wine lovers that there are more choices than ever these days of both types of delights. They do admit it makes pairing more difficult, not easier. To prove that the culinary scene is a maze these days, they give tips on coupling foods with beer, spirits, coffee, tea and even water. The most fun and helpful chapters are 'What to Eat with What You Drink' and 'What to Drink with What You Eat.' You simply look up a specific wine or ingredient and will be given a few ideas. Here are a few to savor: ..."
Lisa Messinger, Copley News Service (October 1, 2007)

Jeffrey Morgenthaler

"Ten Books Every Bartender Should Own....[H]ere are my recommendations for the top ten books any bartender or home mixologist should keep within arm's reach at all times....10. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. Sometimes consuming alcohol is something done alone at an airport bar, a necessary drug dose taken before a bumpy ride. But when alcohol shows its true beauty is when it is enjoyed with good food. This book not only helps take some of the mystery out of pairing alcohol with food, it also helps open the door to approaching booze from a more culinary perspective. This one came out just last year, so it still runs a little steep. Pick up a copy here, or just add it to your Wish List and hope that someone takes notice this season."
Jeffrey Morgenthaler, JeffreyMorgenthaler.com (October 1, 2007)

ProChef SmartBrief

"Chefs are ready to sniff, swirl and match the wine. Although chef participation has been limited at the International Wine Center for the past quarter century, that trend is changing as more chefs take classes to learn about wine, says the center's president, Mary Ewing-Mulligan. Today, more chefs are partnering with their sommeliers to match their restaurants' wine lists with their creative cuisine, according to Kelly Magyarics, an instructor at Washington Wine Academy. The Washington Post [by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg] (9/26)."
ProChef SmartBrief, Culinary Institute of America (September 28, 2007)

Wine News Review

"Weekend wine list — experts' picks. Comparing the picks: A survey of recent selections from top wine experts. Whenever there's an option, I highlight the more-affordable wines, focusing on possible choices for weekend purchases. Check their websites for full descriptions and other picks: 2006 Bucci Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Superiore:
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg — under the 'Soft and Mineral' category … a 'great match' with creamier seafood dishes. $22."
Sam Meddis, Wine News Review (September 28, 2007)

"Recently, we were able to snag a few free minutes of 'Top Chef' finalist Hung Huynh's time, and he graciously agreed to play our "Twenty Questions" game....JJ: Your plates are beautiful, and you list CULINARY ARTISTRY as one of your favorite cookbooks. Which aspect of cooking do you enjoy most, the science or the artistry? HH: The artistry and the inspiration that comes from your surroundings and your soul."
Java Junkie, Top Chef: They Cook, We Dish (September 27, 2007)

"My guests today are Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, wine columnists for The Washington Post and authors of several books including CULINARY ARTISTRY, BECOMING A CHEF, DINING OUT, THE NEW AMERICAN CHEF, and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, which is one of my most dog-eared books at home...."
Kerry Nolan, host, "Living Today," on Martha Stewart Living Radio (September 26, 2007)

"I was intrigued recently to read Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page’s weekly wine column in The Washington Post describing initiation into the Wine Century Club. The concept is simple: download a checklist of common and off-the-beaten-path wine varietals, try 100 of them, mail in your completed list, and receive a free certificate designating you as a member of the Wine Century Club (bragging rights included). I boldly but wrongly figured that in all of the tastings I have held and attended, reaching 100 varietals would be simple. Truth be told, getting past 75 or so was a bit of a challenge....For more information and to download the checklist, visit the Wine Century Club’s Web site, www.winecentury.com. Good luck, and happy sipping!"
Kelly A. Magyarics, Wine Enthusiast magazine (September 26, 2007)

Vinapedia.net

"The Washington Post’s Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg report that D.C.-area chefs are starting to cook with the wine list in mind. That must be a relief to the long suffering sommeliers of the world. The dining-out duo interview area chefs from Hook, in Georgetown and New Heights in Woodley Park, getting their picks. These include two favorites: 2006 Duckhorn Vineyards Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($25) and 2006 Bucci Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Superiore ($22)."
Michael Mattis, Vinapedia.net (September 26, 2007)

"Artichokes and Wine: 'If you are going to serve artichoke hearts, Manzanilla or Fino Sherry is the magical pairing,' says Tim Kopec, wine director of Veritas Restaurant, New York, in the new book WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. 'That is a great party right there: Get a few people together, cook and stuff some artichokes any way you want, and serve a fresh chilled Manzanilla. It will be a great way to start your dinner.'"
Women & Wine magazine (2007)

Photo: Kevin Clark
Chef John Wabeck pursues sommelier studies

"More Chefs Have Wine In Mind."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (September 26, 2007) and am New York (September 26, 2007)

"BITS & PIECES: Today's list: Celebrities who once worked at McDonald's: Shania Twain. Sharon Stone. Jay Leno. Pink. Jeff Bezos. Carl Lewis. Rachel McAdams. Andrew Dornenburg. D.L. Hughley. Macy Gray."
San Antonio Express-News (September 22, 2007)

Wine News Review

"Comparing the faves: A survey of recent selections from respected wine experts. Whenever there’s an option, I highlight their more-affordable picks, focusing on possible choices for weekend purchases. Check out their websites for background and other picks...2006 Cono Sur Casablanca Valley Sauvignon Blanc: Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg'a perfect match of soft, creamy flavors, making it difficult to tell where the oyster ends and the wine begins.' $12."
Sam Meddis, Wine News Review
(September 21, 2007)

Photo: Nikki Kahn
Cono Sur Sauvignon Blanc

"A Veteran's Take on Pairings."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (September 19, 2007) and The Newark Star-Ledger (September 26, 2007)

B L A C K__I N K

"THE LIST: Wine Experts from Around the World Give Their Favorite Restaurant Cellars....Ferran Adria, Joe Bastianich, Daniel Boulud, Ann Colgin, Jean-Luc Le Du, Karen Page....Page is a wine columnist for the Washington Post and has written with her husband, Andrew Dornenburg, several books on wine and culinary arts...."
Ben Cramer, Black Ink: The Wine Issue (Fall 2007)

Photo: Dan Mills
2005 Etude Pinot Noir

"From the Grape State of California."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (September 12, 2007)

Photo: Susan Biddle
Iron Horse sparkling wine: American icon

"If You Go By the Book, They're Icons."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (September 5, 2007) and The (NJ) Herald News (September 12, 2007)

"It's high season for tomatoes, that short but intense period when locally grown tomatoes seem to be everywhere: Farm stands, supermarkets, back-yard vines...And, to make it even more celebratory, be sure to pour some wine even though there's a challenge in finding one that will work with the lively, mouth-filling flavor tomatoes bring to the table....In their book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg recommend a number of wines for tomatoes in their various forms: Pour a rosé with raw tomatoes, a Spanish albarino for tomato confit, sangiovese and barbera for cooked tomatoes, and so on. They also quote Brian Duncan, wine director of Chicago's Bin 36 restaurant. Serve a gewurztraminer with a platter of differently colored tomato slices sprinkled with olive oil, sea salt and basil and, he predicted, 'People will think you are a rock star!' Duncan told the authors that pairing raw tomatoes with the fruity, high-acid German wine would make it seem like you were tasting a tomato 'for the very first time'."
Bill Daley, The Chicago Tribune (September 5, 2007), The Idaho Statesman (September 19, 2007), Lincoln Journal-Star (September 26, 2007), Newsday (September 11, 2007), The Orlando Sentinel (September 12, 2007), and The St. Louis Post-Dispatch (September 19, 2007)

I n s a t i a b l e__C r i t i c

"NYC Women Chefs Join in the Fight against Breast and Ovarian Cancer September 17. A constellation of New York’s star women chefs will be cooking at the 4th annual 'A Second Helping of Life,' Monday, September 17 at Chelsea Piers to raise funds for SHARE, a city-based organization that offers peer-led support to women with breast or ovarian cancer, their families and friends. Expect signature dishes by Rebecca Charles (Pearl Oyster), Annisa’s Anita Lo, Amy Scherber of Amy’s Bread, Sarabeth Levine, Patricia Yeo of Monkey Bar,  Prune’s Gabrielle Hamilton, Amanda Freitag from Gusto, District’s  Patricia Williams, Ariane Daguin of D’Artagnan, Inc. and a dozen others.  Among those donning aprons as celebrity sous chefs will be Swoosie Kurtz, Marsha Mason, Kathleen Chalfant, WWOR-TV’s Brenda Blackmon, authors Carol Higgins Clark, Leslie Bennetts and Karen Page, journalist Linda Stasi and comedian Judy Gold. When: Monday, September 17, 6 PM VIP reception, 7 PM – 9 PM General Admission. Where: Piers 60 at Chelsea Piers. Admission: Starts at $300 pp. Call: 212-719-0364 for reservations and information."
Gael Greene, Insatiable-Critic.com (August 28, 2007)

Photo credit: Lois Raimondo
Rasika chef Vikram Sunderam

"Pour, Munch and You're on Vacation."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (August 22, 2007), The Herald / Record News (NJ) (August 29, 2007), and The Recorder (NY) (August 2007)

I n s a t i a b l e__C r i t i c

Photo credit: Karen Page
Elvis Presley at Southern Hospitality

"...Cameras emerge from our pockets flashing, as my friends, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (becomingachef.com), capture my finger pointing to Elvis. They have an illustrated web journal too.  And then more flash. We’re immortalizing the nachos a scary swamp with delicious pulled pork, $4.95 extra. Surprise, this daunting mess is not just edible, it’s almost delicious. The hostess spies our dual camera action. 'May I take your picture?' she asks thinking us just the usual tourists. No thanks, we say, giggling, not wanting to confess we’re shooting the chicken crusty southern fried bird, juicy and good.  Andrew, a self-designated authority, even approves the tater tots...."
Gael Greene, Insatiable-Critic.com (August 22, 2007)

"Milt [Rosenberg, host of Extension 720] talks with Dave Grotto, Martin Cole, and Rosie Newsome about food safety issues (08/16/07); and then with Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page on their book DINING OUT (10/22/98)."
"Extension 720 with Milt Rosenberg," Podcast, WGN Radio (Chicago) (August 21, 2007)

Photo: Katherine Frey
Jaleo beverage manager Brian Cook

"With Tomatoes, It's an Acid Test."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (August 15, 2007), The (Raleigh, NC) News & Observer (August 22, 2007), and The Santa Rosa Press Democrat (August 22, 2007)

"Unique pairings for stone fruits: A ripe peach, dripping with juices and eaten out of hand, is one of summer's most memorable pleasures. But those same peaches, poached in a wine syrup with a fragrant sprig of cinnamon basil, present an unexpected collaboration of ingredients that's equally unforgettable. Although the following is not meant to be a definitive list — you may have your own favorite pairings — here are some ideas for combining stone fruits with complimentary flavors. Use this as a guide for creating your own pairing pleasures. Apricot flavor affinities: Pure vanilla and almond extracts, dark brown sugar; freshly grated lemon zest and juice, cherries, raspberries, strawberries, nectarines, peaches; freshly grated nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice and cardamom; mint, Mexican tarragon; almonds, hazelnuts; brandy, Cointreau, Grand Marnier, Kirsch. Nectarine flavor affinities: Almonds, hazelnuts; blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, cherries, figs, lemon, lime; basil, cinnamon basil, mint; brown sugar, caramel; cinnamon, ginger, black pepper, vanilla; framboise, champagne. Peach flavor affinities: Almonds, hazelnuts, pecans; apricots, blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, cherries, red currants, plums, citrus fruits (lemon, lime, orange); basil, cinnamon basil, Mexican tarragon; cinnamon, cloves, ginger, vanilla; brown sugar, caramel, honey, maple syrup; bourbon, brandy, Cassis, champagne, framboise, Grand Marnier, Kirsch, rum. Plum/Italian plum flavoraffinities: Almonds, walnuts; apricots, cherries, grapefruit, lemon, oranges, peaches, rhubarb; basil, mint; brown sugar, caramel, honey; cinnamon, ginger, vanilla; brandy, Muscat, Sauternes, red wine. Sources: CULINARY ARTISTRY by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page...."
The Seattle Times
(August 15, 2007)

"Right Beverage Will Enhance Your Barbecue....Lemon or butter: Here's a great tip from WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Bullfinch, 2006, $35): If you're eating food that would be enhanced by a lemon or lime, try an un-oaked white wine such as sauvignon blanc or Riesling. If the food would taste good with a dollop of butter, then an oaky white wine like California chardonnay is good idea. The lemon-lime test works well for nonalcoholic drinks, too. Lemonade or water with a twist of citrus works well with simple grilled fish."
Mark Stryker,The Tucson Citizen (August 15, 2007), The Baxter (Arkansas) Bulletin (August 29, 2007), The Cherry Hill (New Jersey) Courier Post (August 29, 2007), Pacific Daily News (Guam) (September 5, 2007), Sauk Valley (Illinois) Newspapers (August 15, 2007), and Springfield News-Leader (August 15, 2007)

"Big Article in Today's Washington Post. Two of our most famous members, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, have written another excellent article on the club. To read it, please go to the Washington Post website."
Steve De Long, The Wine Century Club (August 8, 2007)

Photo credit: James A. Parcell
Maj Capps, left, and William Holby

"Insider Tips of the Century."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (August 8, 2007), The Honolulu Advertiser (August 15, 2007), and The Recorder (August 15, 2007)

"Grape Intuition: In my never-ending search to bring you the best about intuition in the world today, I came across this jolly article in The Washington Post. It has the delightful title, ‘Leave The First Impression To Your Sixth Sense' and is about the role of intuition in wine, wine-making and allied viticulture crafts. The authors speak of the book which has helped them most ‘to expand our appreciation and enjoyment of wine than any other.' Now, I bet you’re thinking of some hefty tome or some diligent treatise about the craft of wine-making. I hate to tell you, but you’d be wrong. The book, in fact, is by Laura Day and is called Practical Intuition.... The authors (Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg) go on to quote a number of wine-makers and how they rely upon their intuition."
Nigel and Maggie Percy, Intuition Center (August 6, 2007)

"Cool Book of the Day: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea Even Water Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page."
Dan Janal, CoolBookOfTheDay.com
(August 3, 2007)



"For August, we will feature a Librarian Recommends title: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. The review will be released on the blog and the book will be on display in the LRC."
"Fresh Books," CHIC (Cooking & Hospitality Institute of Chicago) Library and Tutoring Center (August 2, 2007)

Photo credit: Lois Raimondo
IndeBleu sommelier Saeed Bennani

"Vintners Who Share A Vision."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (August 1, 2007)

"What to Drink with Your Burger: That inestimable duo of Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg answer the age-old question in the Washington Post."
Charlie Suisman, Manhattan User's Guide (July 30, 2007)

"For foodies and oenophiles, the summer rocks. But even if your idea of the perfect backyard barbecue is to char a few burgers and dogs and pop open a cold Budweiser or down a fifth of lemonade, you can enhance your feast by paying a bit more attention to what you drink with what you eat. The Free Press is here to help. We've consulted a range of experts, including a chef, a sommelier, assorted wine nuts (including yours truly) and books. What follows are some guidelines for grilled cow, lamb, pig, chicken, fish and vegetables with wine, beer and other beverages from hard cider to sparkling water and apple juice. The idea, as always with food and drink combinations, is to find matches that elevate taste and pleasure to a new level of sensation. As the new book WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bulfinch Press, $35) puts it: 1+1=3."
Mark Stryker, The Detroit Free Press (July 28, 2007)

"Week of July 23rd, 2007: Summer selections abound, with Riesling and rose wines getting lots of well-deserved attention....Rose wines are the subject of a fine column in The Washington Post by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg."
John Gillespie, "Wine Opinions," Wine Review Weekly (July 2007)

Photo credit: Carol Guzy
The Capital Grille's burger & wine

"Burger Buddies."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post
(July 25, 2007), (W. Paterson, NJ) Herald News (August 1, 2007), and The Oregonian (September 11, 2007)

"Featured Runners: Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg - New York City, NY. We are both long-time dedicated runners so much so, that we planned our honeymoon around running a marathon together: the 1990 Montreal International Marathon. We were married on August 25, 1990, and ate our way through Quebec City and Montreal for 10 days before running the marathon together on the last day of our honeymoon. In the past few years, Andrew has run two New York City Marathons as well as the 2002 Chicago Marathon (3:23). After giving up running for several years, Karen started up again in March 2002 and is back with a vengeance. She completed a 10K in June 2002, and in 2003 she completed two half-marathons (the Women's Half-Marathon in May, and Bronx Half-Marathon in July). We still run frequently, and are both Benefactor members of the New York Road Runners Club, running a couple of races a month on average.  Our most recent 13.1-miler was the 2007 Manhattan Half-Marathon in Central Park on January 21st.  We also ran three half-marathons in 2006:  the Manhattan Half, the Brooklyn Half, and the inaugural New York City Half-Marathon in August 2006 (the same weekend we celebrated our 16-year wedding anniversary!)."
Road Runner Sports (Summer 2007)

"Mary McMahon has been a chef for 20 years and has always wanted to know the history behind the fruits and vegetables she cooks. 'It starts with a seed that's planted, wherever that is,' McMahon said. But now McMahon, culinary director of the new Now We're Cookin' cooking school in Evanston, said the general public seems to be becoming more interested in where their food comes from and in finding the freshest available. She knows that sometimes, though, farmers market customers leave with bags of veggies they have no clear idea how to cook....That's why Now We're Cookin' is hosting a Meet the Grower lecture and cooking demonstration series this summer....For those who can't make it to the series, McMahon recommends reference cookbooks such as Farmer John's Cookbook by John Peterson (Gibbs Smith, 2006), CULINARY ARTISTRY by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Wiley, 1996) and The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 75th anniversary edition 2006)."
Stephanie Fosnight, Pioneer Press (July 19, 2007)

Photo credit: Julia Ewan
Domaines Ott rose

"Leave the First Impression to Your Sixth Sense."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (July 18, 2007), The (Everett, WA) Herald (July 22, 2007), and The (Amsterdam, NY) Recorder (July 25, 2007)

"From the world of the bizarre, a lesson: Pair food & wine properly. Police on Washington's Capitol Hill are baffled by an attempted robbery that began with a handgun put to the head of a 14-year-old girl and ended in a group hug. It started around midnight on June 16 when a group of friends was finishing dinner on the patio of a District of Columbia home, authorities and witnesses said. That's when a hooded man slid through an open gate and pointed a handgun at the girl's head. 'Give me your money, or I'll start shooting,' he said, the witnesses told The Washington Post. Everyone froze, they said, but then one guest spoke up. 'We were just finishing dinner,' Cristina Rowan, 43, told the man. 'Why don't you have a glass of wine with us?' The intruder had a sip of their Chateau Malescot St-Exupery and said, 'Damn, that's good wine.' The girl's father, Michael Rabdau, 51, told him to take the whole glass, and Rowan offered him the bottle. The would-be robber, with his hood down, took another sip and a bite of Camembert cheese and put the gun in his sweat pants. Then the story got even more bizarre. The man with the gun apologized, the witnesses told the Post. 'I think I may have come to the wrong house,' he said. 'Can I get a hug?' Rowan stood up and wrapped her arms around the man and the four other guests followed. The man walked away a few moments later with the crystal wine glass in hand. No one was hurt, but once he was gone, the group went inside, locked the door and called 911. Police said Friday that the case was strange but true. Investigators have not located a suspect. 'We've had robbers that apologize and stuff, but nothing where they sit down and drink wine,' Cmdr. Diane Groomes said. 'The only good thing is they would be able to identify him because they hugged them.' (The Associated Press) This story also got a bit of airtime on ABC news. The major difference between the two stories as reported was that the group was eating hors d'oeuvres as the villain arrived and was offered a grilled shrimp with his wine. Mon Dieu. The robber was not a vinofile or he would have immediately opened fire. Grilled shrimp and Chateau Malescot St. Exupery? Thankfully it was a good year because any French mugger worth his salt would have been appalled at the affront. No informed thief would have accepted anything less than a good white Bordeaux, Sancerre, Vouvrey or, at the very least, one of the less oakey American Chardonnays. Quick thinking on the part of the guest who offered the wine is to be commended, but after all, under any circumstances, even those as extreme as an armed robbery, proper pairing of wine and food always need to be the primary consideration. I hope they apprehend this jackal, and imprison him for a good long time. Many people complain about their tax dollars being spent on continuing education as a part of criminal rehabilitation, but this is an excellent example of how valuable that rehabilitation can be. The cad obviously has an innate appreciation of good wine but needs refinement of his skills. Wine Spectator Magazine offers an online course in wine and food pairing and there are several good books on the subject....What to Drink, What to Eat: The Definitive Guide to pairing Wine, Beer Spirits etc. Based on Expert Advice by America's Best Sommeliers (sic), by Andrew Dornenberg, et. al. (sic), is also highly rated. In the event of exactly this type of emergency I strongly suggest you always have one of these references handy. Paperback is easier to carry around. Hardcover makes a better bludgeon in case the glass of wine is ineffective. Which ever you choose, don't forget the power of wine and, oh yes, the group hug. Enjoy."
Jack Felber, proprietor, The Olympia Tea Room (in Watch Hill, RI), in The Westerly Sun (July 18, 2007)

"2007 Best New Chef Award Profile: Sean O'Brien, Myth, San Francisco. Why he won: Because he uses global ingredients to create dishes that are unfussy but wonderfully nuanced, like shrimp poke with edamame and seaweed. Most memorable cooking experience: 'After Myth opened and the buzz started, a lot of the local chefs started coming into the restaurant — Ron Siegel (an F&W Best New Chef 1999), Laurent Gras (an F&W Best New Chef 2002), Daniel Patterson (an F&W Best New Chef 1997), Gérald Hirigoyen (an F&W Best New Chef 1994). It was so flattering.' Favorite cookbook: CULINARY ARTISTRY, by Andrew Dornenberg and Karen Page. 'It’s been out for about 10 years. I use it as a guide to find classic combinations — when I’m designing a new menu and I want to figure out what pairs well with plums, it’s a good reference.'"
Food & Wine magazine (July 2007)

"[CULINARY ARTISTRY has] been a valuable source of inspiration…lots of great recipes…”
Delicious magazine (Australia) (July 2007)

"It is no exaggeration to say that WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bulfinch Press, $35, 2006), by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, is the definitive guide for matching food with wine and other beverages. It was selected as book of the year by the International Association for Culinary Professionals....The chapters that begin the book are especially helpful. They break wine language down to a fundamental level and explain how to think regionally when pairing wine with food (match a wine from a country with a food from that country), how to trust one's senses in pairing wines with foods, and how to pair foods with wines when one is starting with the wine."
William Wood, The Kalamazoo Gazette (July 16, 2007)

it is just grapejuice

"[WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT is] a wonderful surprise....A fun guide which is as difficult to put down as the Food Lover’s Companion and quite possibly as essential. A great reference for  casual entertainers and professionals alike….There is a joy and love that comes across in this book which makes it essential viewing...."
Rob Farrer, itisjustgrapejuice.com (July 13, 2007)

"It was the labels. That's what got Washington Post columnists, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, off on the wrong foot. To them the labels appeared to be 'the work of a hobbyist's laser printer'...leaving them with the lowest of expectations, as they admitted in the Washington Post's July 11 wine column... 'Truth be told, very low.' But true professionals that they are, Karen and Andrew fought the instinct to judge the Calistoga Estate Vineyards by their labels...and for that their palates were rewarded. 'Each held a delicious surprise,' they said. 'We are rarely so happy to be so wrong.'"
Steve Silver, proprietor, Pearson's Wine Blog (July 12, 2007)

Photo credit: Bill O'leary
Calistoga Estate Vineyards' Marvin Stirman

"California Wine with D.C. Roots."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (July 11, 2007), Daily Hampshire Gazette (July 15, 2007), and the Newark Star-Ledger (August 18, 2007)

Photo credit: Nikki Kahn
Grace Family Vineyards wines

"The Wine of Human Kindness."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (July 4, 2007), The (Amsterdam, NY) Recorder (July 4, 2007), Cleveland Plain Dealer (July 18, 2007), and The Louisville Courier-Journal (July 14, 2007)

"...Here's a three-step guide to pairing cocktails with your favorite ‘cue. Go For the Smoke: According to pairings mavens Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, co-authors of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, cocktails made with 'brown spirits' bourbon, brandy, aged rum or whiskey are the best bet for pairing with barbecue. 'Barbecue pairings often feature bourbon, as the smoky, woody flavor of the spirit complements the smoky flavor of the meat,' Dornenburg and Page explain. Not surprisingly, a number of BBQ sauces also feature bourbon as a key ingredient. And bourbon, like barbecue, plays an integral role in culinary Americana."
Kara Newman, Chile Pepper magazine (June 2007)

"WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: the definitive guide to pairing food with wine, beer, spirits, coffee, tea — even water — based on expert advice from America's best sommeliers (Bulfinch Press, 2006) by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page has been named 2007 IACP Cookbook of the Year. This award and others given by the International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) were announced April 14 at the IACP Awards Gala in Chicago. The book teaches food lovers how to think like a sommelier and make every bite be it for breakfast, lunch or dinner a peak experience. There are beverage recommendations from experts at dozens of America's best restaurants, and readers can search by beverage to find the perfect food match. Additional infoirmation includes the selection and service of wines, beers, teas and other beverages."
Kristi Mace, The National Culinary Review, the official magazine of the American Culinary Federation (June 2007)

"Paired to Perfection....Escoffier, the august chef who once declared that red wines must be drunk with meat, Champagne with entremets and white wine with fish, must be wincing in his grave. That's because his are no longer rules to live or eat and drink by. "The rules of pairing have changed, because the world of beverages has changed," says Karen Page, co-author of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. "Today, when you say red wine, do you mean a light and fruity Pinot Noir? Or a big tannic Cabernet Sauvignon? Do you mean a slightly sweet sparkling Shiraz? Or a very sweet late harvest Zinfandel? They're all red wines, but some of them would be god-awful with red meat." As for that meat, she says, "Are we talking a two-inch-thick dryaged steak off the grill? Or a finely chopped, delicate steak tartare? The former still calls for a red, while the latter could even be served with a white, like an off-dry Alsatian Riesling."
The Times of India (June 30, 2007)

"Chef Ryan Pfeiffer...Favorite chefs: My instructor, Tim Bucci, has been very encouraging. He's also one of the coaches of our culinary team. I don't really look up to many people for inspiration. There's a certain book I go to when I need help called CULINARY ARTISTRY."
Eloise Marie Valadez, Daily Southtown (Chicago)
(June 28, 2007)


Photo credit: Marvin Joseph

"What Goes Swimmingly With Salmon."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (June 27, 2007), The Miami Herald (July 5, 2007), The Monterey Herald (June 27, 2007), and The Newark Star-Ledger (July 25, 2007)

"For Summer Ease, Turn to Italy."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (June 20, 2007), The (Everett, WA) Herald (July 8, 2007), The Louisville Courier-Journal (June 23, 2007), The Newark Star-Ledger (July 21, 2007), and The (Amsterdam, NY) Recorder


Photo credit: Katherine Frey

"Dark Reds and Leafy Greens."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (June 13, 2007), Daily Hampshire (MA) Gazette (June 17, 2007), Daily (Loveland, CO) Reporter-Herald (June 13, 2007), The (Everett, WA) Herald (June 17, 2007), Napa Valley Register (June 22, 2007), (Newark, NJ) Star-Ledger (August 4, 2007), (IN) Post-Tribune (June 15, 2007), The Recorder and The Santa Rosa Press-Democrat (June 27, 2007)

THE WEEK

"Virginia Wines: Back after 400 years. Virginians have been making wine almost from the moment the first British settlers arrived in Jamestown in 1607, said Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg in The Washington Post. A 1619 law even commanded all male heads of household to grow grapevines. Unfortunately, the pest known as phylloxera eventually destroyed many of those vines. Four centuries later, Virginiathanks to its hot, humid climatehas become 'the fifth-largest wine-producing state.' These Virginia wines merit special recommendation...."
The Week, "a witty, informative, and completely indispensable digest of the best reporting and writing from the U.S. and international press" (June 8, 2007)

"Does she cook like an angel? Don't count on it....New York food writer Karen Page, 45, is co-author of several food books with her husband, Andrew Dornenburg. Though Page 'know[s] more about food than arguably anybody else in America who doesn't cook,' she says she doesn't have the patience for cooking. 'I'm happy to be married to a chef who does have that kind of patience and talent,' she says....Though people may be cooking less at home, they are watching more cooking on television. The decrease in home cooking has occurred alongside the seemingly incongruous rise of the Food Network, a cable television juggernaut devoted to food and cooking. The network, which launched in 1993, helped create the modern celebrity chef including the ubiquitous Ray and Emeril Lagasse and usher in a popular cooking craze. Food writer Page sees this trend as happening because of, not in spite of, the fact that women are cooking less or not at all. Cooking, she says, is transitioning from 'women's work' to 'chef's work.' By ever more visibly assuming a role once held by the nation's wives and mothers, chefs 'have won our love and affection,' she says. 'June Cleaver...doesn't exist anymore, but now when you turn on the TV you've got 'Top Chef' and you've got the Food Network,' Page says. 'We really look to chefs the way we used to look to mothers in television and popular culture.' Balzer and Page both believe that women who don't cook may be on the leading edge of a trend in which cooking, like sewing, gardening and other domestic arts before it, will become more of a professional or recreational pursuit than an everyday skill."
Amy Eagle, "Culture," The Chicago Tribune (June 6, 2007)

"IACP: That stands for International Association of Culinary Professionals. Every year, they hand out cookbook awards, and they are considered the most prestigious in the industry. Well, I am very honored to have on the phone with me right now the two authors of the book that won the 2007 IACP 'Cookbook of the Year Award,' and they are Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, the authors of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT....What a wonderful couple. They have written some fantastic books. The latest one is just terrific: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, and it's available at atyourtable1660.com. A great Father's Day gift!"
Patrick Neas, morning show host, KXTR Radio / Kansas City (June 6, 2007)


Photo credit: Katherine Frey

"Turn Up the Sweet for Summer Desserts."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (June 6, 2007), The (Everett, WA) Herald (July 1, 2007) and The Newark Star-Ledger (June 20, 2007)

"Becoming a Wine Connoisseur: Part II. Wine was made to go with food, and there's a whole art and science to wine and food pairing....WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Dornenburg and Page): I love this book. Look up a food and it tells you what drink (wine, beer, cocktail, tea) goes best with it. Look up a wine and it tells you what foods go best with it. Best wine with salmon? Oregon pinot noir. Wow."
Tony Dunn, The Chico Beat (May 31, 2007)

THE TRITON

"Master sommelier Karen Page and professional chef Andrew Dornenburg have again combined talents to write WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (2006, Bullfinch Press, $35). Their previous books include CULINARY ARTISTRY and BECOMING A CHEF, winner of a James Beard award....Content aside, the presentation of the information is outstanding. Charts, indices and graphs are used to organize the volume of detail. The photography and illustrations are subtle and secondary. Quotes from philosophers, writers and food professionals are scattered throughout to gently reinforce the authors' points and add dimension to the text. Professionals will be satisfied with the reference value of the book while the hobbyist and casual entertainer will find hours of entertainment."
Donna Mergenhagen, The Triton (May 31, 2007)

"We're speaking with Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, authors of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT....You guys have a great column in The Washington Post, in the Food section...."
Bob Kur and Hillary Howard, WTOP Radio (May 30, 2007)


Photo credit: Julia Ewan

"Four Hot Prospects For Summer Sipping."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (May 30, 2007), The Louisville Courier-Journal (June 2, 2007) and The Newark Star-Ledger (June 9, 2007)

"It's a rare book that can help boost sales in your restaurant, make your waitstaff's job a lot easier, and dramatically lower the odds that customers will have a negative experience. But Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page's WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bulfinch Press; $35) can have these effects on your restaurant if you merely follow its tenets....Dornenburg and Page are no slouches, either: Both hold sommelier certificates and, as readers of their previous Beard Award-winning books (CULINARY ARTISTRY, et al.) are aware, they know what makes restaurants tick....When it all comes together, as it does in this book, the result is a reference work of great depth and scope."
Restaurant Hospitality (May 2007)

"Bottles That Won't Break the Bank."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (May 23, 2007) The Ashland Daily Tidings (May 26, 2007), The Connecticut Post (May 30, 2007), The Newark Star-Ledger (June 16, 2007), and The Recorder

"Your top three favorite cookbooks are: CULINARY ARTISTRY [period]."
Dale, contestant, "Top Chef" on Bravo TV (and formerly of Chicago's Trio and Blackbird) (May 2007)

"Your top three favorite cookbooks are: CULINARY ARTISTRY and El Bulli."
Hung, contestant, "Top Chef" on Bravo TV (and executive sous chef of Guy Savoy in Las Vegas) (May 2007)

"Your top three favorite cookbooks are: CULINARY ARTISTRY and The French Laundry Cookbook."
Sara N., contestant, "Top Chef" on Bravo TV (and executive sous chef of Boucarou, formerly of Per Se, in NYC) (May 2007)

"Tying the Knot With Bubbles."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (May 16, 2007) and The Newark Star-Ledger (May 26, 2007)

"Both the James Beard Awards and the International Association of Culinary Professionals have recently released the winners of their annual cookbook competitions....In IACP competition, Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page won the Cookbook of the Year for WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: the definitive guide to pairing food with wine, beer, spirits, coffee, tea — even water — based on expert advice from America's best sommeliers ($35, Bullfinch Press)."
Kitty Crider, Austin American-Statesman (May 16, 2007)

"Two food associations have named their top cookbooks of 2006. ...The International Association of Culinary Professionals named WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dorenburg and Karen Page the cookbook of the year."
The Columbus Dispatch (May 16, 2007)

"WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT was named the best cookbook of 2006 and it's not even a cookbook! It's a big deal....The authors have written some of the most groundbreaking books...in the culinary profession. Their body of work is incredible."
Patrick Neas, Gary Evert and Mike McGonigle, "At Your Table," KXTR Radio / Kansas City (May 12, 2007)

"If it's spring, the cookbook awards must be blooming. This year, the two major awards the James Beard Foundation and the International Association of Culinary Professionals diverge in what each considers to be the best of the books.... INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CULINARY PROFESSIONALS Cookbook of the year: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food With Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea Even Water Based on Expert Advice From America's Best Sommeliers, by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Bulfinch Press)."
Lee Svitak Dean, Minneapolis Star Tribune
(May 9, 2007)


Credit: Stephanie Gross

"Virginia Vintages That Can Hold Their Own."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (May 9, 2007)

"Top awards in the two major annual U.S. cookbook contests have gone to a collection of stories and recipes from the American South and a guide to food and wine pairing....The food-wine pairing book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Bulfinch Press) led in IACP's wine, beer or spirits category."
Julian Armstrong, The Montreal Gazette (May 9, 2007)

"For people who love food and cooking, it's almost inevitable that a mother or grandmother loomed large in their culinary upbringing. And whether Mom or Grandma worked full time or stayed at home, whether she still lives next door or out of state or has passed on to the great hereafter, her influence continues to shape our food lives. Famous chefs abound with these types of stories. Boston's Jasper White, for example, says his grandmother introduced him to his favorite thing in the world. 'All the time I spent with my grandmother, I just sat there and watched her do the cooking. I never cooked. I just ate it, that's all. And still, my great love is eating,' he is quoted in Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page's BECOMING A CHEF."
Karen Miltner, Rochester Democrat & Chronicle (May 8, 2007)

"A book about pairing drinks with foods took top honors this year at the International Association of Culinary Professionals' annual Cookbook Awards. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food With Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea Even Water Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers, by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Bulfinch Press), was selected cookbook of the year in what, in culinary circles, is the equivalent of the Academy Awards. The book was selected from among 500 books published in Australia, Canada, England, France, India, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, the United Kingdom and the United States. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT also won the Beer or Spirits Category, one of 13 categories in which cookbooks received awards. "
William R. Wood, The Kalamazoo Gazette (May 7, 2007)

"Between the covers. The Barefoot Contessa and other pros share their top tips for entertaining: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. (Bulfinch Press, $35). This foodie duo has been called 'the brightest young author team on the culinary scene today.' They've written seven books and are experts on flavor development and compatibilities.Their top tips:
1. What goes with what. An easy way to pair food and drink is to think regionally; if it grows together it goes together. Examples: If you're serving a Japanese meal, serve sake; for German fare, try a German beer or wine.
2. All water is not the same. There are five gradations of water that go from flat to very fizzy (they are charted in the book), and the wrong one can detract from the food and vice versa. A delicate food like sushi needs a flat, neutral water, while a strong food like pizza needs water with sharp bubbles to cut the fat and spice.
3. Have the right glassware. Glass that's too thick makes it hard to taste wine, and different shapes enhance different varieties. But right doesn't mean expensive; fine glassware comes in every price range and lower-priced glasses are preferable if you're hard on them. The authors favor Riedel's lower-priced lines.
4. Wines to stock. Always be prepared. * Any good champagne or sparkling wine, either white or rose. * German Riesling is the most versatile, food-friendly wine and goes with everything.
* Pinot noir, the most food-friendly red wine, can take you from fish to steaks. * Moscato d'Asti, the most versatile sweet wine, works for brunches and desserts. * Sparkling cider, which comes in many varieties, is the perfect alternative to wine."
Lisa Skolnik, The Chicago Tribune Magazine (May 6, 2007)

"With Seafood, Try Reeling In a Great White."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (May 2, 2007) and The (Everett, WA) Herald (May 27, 2007)

"Stumped? It's easy to find help with pairings. Sorting out which wine goes with which food has grown easier of late. You can find help in books, classes and online and even in a chat with a favorite wine retailer. Books on wine and food matching have been hot. Some to consider include...WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page....Dornenburg and Page present a formidable array of experts, who offer an encyclopedic roster of pairing suggestions. One chapter offers matches for wine, the next offers matches for food. So thorough are they that there are wines to go with fast-food fried chicken."
Bill Daley, The Orlando Sentinel (May 2, 2007), The Idaho Statesman (April 25, 2007), and Lee's Summit (MO) Journal (May 22, 2007)


"The International Association of Culinary Professionals recently held its Awards Gala in Chicago. The Cookbook of the Year Award (winner in the wine, beer or spirits category) went to Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page for their book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food With Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea -- Even Water -- Based on Expert Advice From America's Best Sommeliers (Bulfinch Press; $35)."
The Grand Rapids Press (May 2, 2007)

"Beverage-pairing book is 'Cookbook of the Year.' The International Association of Culinary Professionals recently held its Awards Gala in Chicago. The Cookbook of the Year Award (winner in the wine, beer or spirits category) went to authors Andrew Lornenburg (sic) and Karen Page for their book WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food With Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea Even Water Based on Expert Advice From America's Best Sommeliers (Bulfinch Press; $35). Awards were presented in 13 categories. For a list of all of the winners, go to www.iacp.com."
The Syracuse Post-Standard (May 2, 2007)



"Sorting out which wine goes with which food has gotten easier of late. You can find help in books, classes and online and even in a quick chat with your favorite wine retailer. Books on wine and food matching have been hot. Some to consider include Perfect Pairings by Evan Goldstein, Everyday Dining With Wine by Andrea Immer Robinson and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. The latter just won The International Association of Culinary Professionals Cookbook of the Year."
Anchorage Daily News (May 2, 2007)

"The International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) is a worldwide organization made up of 4,000 members involved in culinary education, communication, and the restaurant industry. The annual IACP awards were created to encourage quality in cookbook and food literature and to spread awareness of culinary publications. 2007 IACP COOKBOOK OF THE YEAR: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: the definitive guide to pairing food with wine, beer, spirits, coffee, tea even water based on expert advice from America's best sommeliers."
Brett Moore, GourmetFood.About.com (April 2007)

"...When the ingredients are uncommon...chefs are driven to research and experiment to learn how to use them. At West Restaurant & Bar in Vancouver, B.C., pastry chef Rhonda Viani scours cookbooks, turning up resources such as the flavor maps in CULINARY ARTISTRY."
Priscilla Martel, Flavor & The Menu (Spring 2007)

"The International Association of Culinary Professionals has announced their cookbook award winners....The Cookbook of the Year is WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dorenburg and Karen Page."
Charleston Post and Courier (April 26, 2007)

"Making the Match with Mushrooms."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (April 25, 2007), Chico Enterprise Record (May 16, 2007), The Herald, Louisville Courier-Journal (May 5, 2007), Onet.pl (Polish Web site), San Mateo County Times (May 16, 2007), and The Traverse City Record-Eagle (April 30, 2007)

"Ceviche is the other raw fish swimming to popularity in American restaurants and, bravely perhaps, American home kitchens too. While sushi is Japanese, ceviche is most widely identified with the cuisines of Latin America and the Caribbean. It is raw (or, sometimes, lightly blanched) fish and shellfish 'cooked' in an acidic citrus juice, usually lime or lemon. The juice is what gives this dish of the freshest of fresh seafood a refreshing zip, yet it poses a serious challenge in wine pairings....Books and Web sites offer pairing suggestions too....And Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, in their WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, range from New Zealand sauvignon blanc, vinho verde, German riesling and sparkling wine. Whatever the wine varietal, the type that works best with ceviche will be one with plenty of zip."
Bill Daley, The Chicago Tribune (April 25, 2007) and The Idaho Statesman, The Macon Telegraph, and The Orlando Sentinel (May 9, 2007)

"The International Association of Culinary Professionals recently held its Awards Gala in Chicago. The Cookbook of the Year Award (winner in the wine, beer or spirits category) went to authors Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page for their book WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food With Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea — Even Water — Based on Expert Advice From America's Best Sommeliers (Bulfinch Press; $35). Almost 500 books were entered in the competition, and awards were presented in 13 categories."
Natalie Haughton, Los Angeles Daily News (April 24, 2007)

"Acclaimed cookbooks: The International Association of Culinary Professionals Cookbook Award Winners were announced in Chicago on April 14....In the Wine, Beer or Spirts Category, the winner was WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Bulfinch Press), which also won the Cookbook of the Year award."
Kathie Smith, Toledo Blade (April 22, 2007)

"Avid wine drinkers and food lovers the world over all face a fairly regular question: What should we drink with this meal? While there have been many published guides on this, nearly all are dry and far too involved and reference-like for regular day to day use. Redeeming this genre of book is the recent publication of Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page's WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea Even Water Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT delivers exactly what it promises the definitive contemporary guide to food and beverage pairings based on current 'expert' opinion and tastes from a wide cross-section of wine and food professionals and sommeliers....Informative and practical....A wonderful guide filled with excellent advice."
Joshua E. London, Washington Examiner (April 21-22, 2007)

"Escoffier, the august chef who once declared that red wines must be drunk with meat, Champagne with entremets and white wine with fish, must be wincing in his grave. That's because his are no longer rules to live or eat and drink by. 'The rules of pairing have changed, because the world of beverages has changed,' says Karen Page, co-author with Andrew Dornenburg, of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. 'Today, when you say red wine, do you mean a light and fruity Pinot Noir? Or a big tannic Cabernet Sauvignon? Do you mean a slightly sweet sparkling Shiraz? Or a very sweet late harvest Zinfandel? They're all red wines, but some of them would be god-awful with red meat.' As for that meat, she says, ' Are we talking a two-inch-thick dry-aged steak off the grill? Or a finely chopped, delicate steak tartare? The former still calls for a red, while the latter could even be served with a white, like an off-dry Alsatian Riesling.' Today, a wine's color doesn't matter nearly as much as its other characteristics: Is it light or full-bodied? Is it delicate or strongly flavored? Moreover, the wine's level of acidity, sweetness, tannin and oak all get in on the act."
Pascale Le Draoulec, Forbes (April 20, 2007)

"I love to say I told you so. I recommended it more than a handful of times. And, if you didn’t take the suggestion then, take it now – before you have to wait to buy WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT.  Sales are surging. Dornenburg and Page, those culinary pensters who tease palates and tickle taste buds with a variety of cookbooks, articles, essays, a great e-newsletter, website, and a weekly Washington Post wine column, captured the profession’s top award the Oscar, if you will of culinary professionals for their bible of pairing bubblies and still, with sautés and roasts. Last Saturday evening, Andrew and Karen graced the stage at the Chicago Hilton, not once, but twice, as they first captured honors for the IACP’s Best Book on Wine, Beer, or Spirits. Then they were awarded the 2007 IACP Cookbook of the Year. A daunting task, as the competition is extreme. Previous winners include Craig Claiborne, Julia Child, and Thomas Keller. Good company. A well deserved honor, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT offers more than most culinary books combined. Tasteful education is hard to come by, however, between the covers of this award winner the pace is quick, the knowledge extensive and the presentation paired perfectly with comments, photos, and tiny idiosyncrasies that dress your visions of perfect dinners, lunches, picnics or cheese plates. For the whole story, visit Dornenburg and Page on their website. For the big picture, buy the book. It will grace your shelf for years to come. An award amongst other covers stained with coffee, Béarnaise, Cabernet, couli and beer. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT is a truly an award winning read. I suggested, long ago, for everyone to buy two- one for the bookshelf, one for the nightstand. A quick glance before nodding feeds your hunger for tomorrow while quenching your thirst with suggestions of great legs and a cassis bouquet."
John Foley, AllBusiness.com (April 20, 2007)

"Two recent food-centric awards ceremonies granted kudos with Washington implications. The Post's new wine columnists, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, won the prestigious 2007 Cookbook of the Year award from the International Association of Culinary Professionals for their reference book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bulfinch, 2006). Page and Dornenburg, who live in New York City, were awarded the honor Saturday night at the IACP's Awards Gala in Chicago. Their book also won top honors in the Wine, Beer or Spirits category."
The Washington Post (April 18, 2007)

"For Oenophiles, a Holy Grail. How many different wine grape varieties have you tasted? We'll bet that your list includes chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon, two of the world's most popular wine grapes. It might also include some or all of the other four that make up the 'noble' grapes, so named for their use in creating the finest wines: merlot, pinot noir, Riesling and sauvignon blanc. But that's a small fraction of the thousands of grape varieties that...."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (April 18, 2007) and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (July 25, 2007)

"Awards Season: The International Association of Culinary Professionals presented its annual awards over the weekend, honoring WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Bulfinch Press) as cookbook of the year. The group gave a lifetime achievement award to legendary Knopf cookbook editor Judith Jones (Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking) and a humanitarian award to Chicago chef-restaurateur Rick Bayless. A full list of winners is at iacp.com."
"Nibbles & Bits," The Miami Herald (April 18, 2007)

"Chefs' special: Cookbooks....If you don't think chefs get emotional about their cookbooks, then you haven't talked to Matt Dillon about his eclectic collection....At their Richmond Beach bistro Hills' Food & Wine, chefs Celestino Jimenez and Chris Hill keep dozens of cookbooks in the dining room, including such modern classics as David Thompson's Thai Food. In addition to providing ideas for dipping sauces, says Jimenez, that book comes in handy when a customer asks, 'What, exactly, is lemongrass?' But he saves his highest praise for CULINARY ARTISTRY, used as a reference for food-pairings. 'If I have a pomegranate, it will tell me what goes with it, what's available that time of year,' says Jimenez, who bought six copies of the book to give away last Christmas."
Nancy Leson, The Seattle Times (April 18, 2007) and Knight-Ridder/Tribune Business News

"The chefs' 'desert island' cookbooks....We asked local chefs, 'What's the one cookbook you wouldn't want to be without?' Celestino Jimenez, Hills' Food & Wine (1843 Richmond Beach Road, Shoreline; 206-542-6353): CULINARY ARTISTRY by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (John Wiley & Sons, $29.95)."
The Seattle Times (April 18, 2007)

"Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page solve the hostess's dilemma with their latest WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bulfinch Press, $35). In case you're wondering what drinks they recommend, the subtitle tells all: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food With Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea — Even Water — Based on Expert Advice From America's Best Sommeliers. Phew! Now that's a mouthful. And not a morsel or sip has been taken. Yet. This ambitious text is a dictionary of foods, tastes and occasions divided into two primary sections: What to Eat With What You Drink, aka Matching Foods to Beverages, and, conversely, What to Drink With What You Eat (Matching Beverages to Foods). Some pairings are zany and irreverent. Serve Asti with Hostess Twinkies, Champagne with churros (sugary Mexican fried-dough bites) and sparkling wine with Church's fried chicken (but dry Spanish sherry with Popeyes fried chicken). Others are more practical. Pour Gruner Veltliner or sparkling Shiraz when you hanker for 'Adventure' (any wine you've never tasted before). Lager beer, Chenin Blanc or Zinfandel go well with jambalaya, and California Chardonnay or Oregon Pinot Noir complement grilled, poached or pan-roasted salmon. If you're aiming to pair food with wine, Dornenburg and Page can help. Petite Syrah is happy with barbecue, cheese, chicken, game and Mexican food, while Vouvray is tops with rillettes, scallops and baked trout with cream sauce. Also in the zany category: lists of 12 wines and their paired dishes that some of America's top restaurateurs and sommeliers would take if banished to that proverbial desert island. WHAT TO DRINK also includes primer info on tasting and pairing rules, starting a wine cellar, appropriate serving temperatures, glassware and, yes, recipes.Novice or professional, beer drinker, tequila aficionado or wine snob, WHAT TO DRINK has you covered."
Lauren Chapin, The Kansas City Star (April 18, 2007)

"At the International Association of Culinary Professionals' annual conference last week in Chicago, longtime Alfred A. Knopf editor Judith Jones received the organization's lifetime achievement award....The IACP also gave out its cookbook awards....[A]wards went to WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Bulfinch Press), which also won cookbook of the year."
Sheryl Julien, The Boston Globe (April 18, 2007)

The Food Section

"Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page's WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT took the prize for Cookbook of the Year at this year's International Association of Culinary Professionals Cookbook Awards."
Josh Friedland, TheFoodSection.com (April 17, 2007)

"IACP DISHES UP AWARDS. Thousands of food pros swarmed Chicago last week for the 2007 IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals) conference, a four-day confab of seminars, workshops, and culinary tours. Rick Bayless, who helped prepare Saturday night's gala dinner, took home the IACP's 2007 Humanitarian Award for his work with the Frontera Farmer Foundation, which supports sustainable local farms. The coveted Cookbook of the Year Award went to WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page."
Louisa Chu, Epicurious.com (April 17, 2007)

"Sorting out which wine goes with which food has gotten easier of late. You can find help in books, classes and online and even in a quick chat with your favorite wine retailer. Books on wine and food matching have been hot. Some to consider include Perfect Pairings, by Evan Goldstein, Everyday Dining with Wine, by Andrea Immer Robinson, and WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page.... Dornenburg and Page present a formidable array of experts, including many from Chicago, in their book, which offers an encyclopedic roster of pairing suggestions. One chapter offers matches for wine, the next offers matches for food. So thorough are they that there are wines to go with fast-food fried chicken."
Bill Daley, The Chicago Tribune (April 18, 2007), Belleville News-Democrat (April 17, 2007) The Glens Falls Post-Star (April 18, 2007), and The Stamford Advocate (April 17, 2007)

"Winners in four categories were announced last night at the International Association of Culinary Professionals' gala dinner at the Hilton Chicago. Readers may be most interested in the cookbook awards, chosen from nearly 500 entries from around the world in 13 categories. Cookbook of the Year was WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea Even Water Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers, by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. Michael Sand edited the book for Bulfinch Press. The book also snagged the wine, beer or spirits category prize....Go here for the complete list of all winners."
Robin Mather Jenkins, The Chicago Tribune (April 15, 2007)

"How to Tempt the 20-Somethings?"
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (April 11, 2007), The Ashland Daily Tidings (April 17, 2007), The (WA) Daily Herald (May 6, 2007), Recorder News (April 11, 2007), Knoxville News Sentinel (April 22, 2007), Louisville Courier-Journal (April 21, 2007), The Miami Herald (May 3, 2007), and The Winnipeg Free Press (April 13, 2007)

"Jeffrey Henderson thought he knew what living large was in the late 1980s when he was notorious as one of San Diego's most successful crack cocaine dealers. He was making as much as $35,000 a week. He owned a large view house in the Dictionary Hill section of Spring Valley and eight cars, including a custom Mercedes 500 SEC convertible. But 20 years later, as the executive chef of Las Vegas' Cafe Bellagio, Henderson is enjoying a different kind of fame. His gripping memoir of his drugs-to-dishes journey, Cooked: From the Streets to the Stove, From Cocaine to Foie Gras (William Morrow, $24.95), made The New York Times best-seller list. In recent weeks, he has been interviewed by Tavis Smiley, Montel Williams and Oprah. Two hours after Oprah aired, Henderson found himself in a limousine. 'They had a driver swoop me up and take me to Will Smith,' Henderson said. 'He was so cool, down-to-earth and real mellow. He reminded me a lot of myself.' Smith's production company bought film rights to the book for $1.2 million....Jeffrey Henderson's reading list Books he read while learning to be a chef: BECOMING A CHEF by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenberg (sic)."
Maria C. Hunt, San Diego Union Tribune (April 11, 2007)

"Executive Profile: Joey Nerenberg. Company: Infusion Culinary Inc. Titles: Executive chef, president. Education: B.A., UC San Diego; M.B.A., University of Minnesota; Culinary Institute of the Pacific, Honolulu....Most influential book: CULINARY ARTISTRY by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. A book that is as much about executing the creative process as it is about cooking."
Liz Wiedemann, San Diego Business Journal (April 9, 2007)

"Are you curious about what wine to order with your cheesecake? Intimidated by five-hundred page wine list at a top restaurant? Downright scared when the sommelier comes charging toward your table? Relax. Authors Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page have created a resource that helps even the ‘average Joe or Jane’ understand the principles of wine and food pairing. They take the conventional, canned, old-school advice of 'red wine with meat, white wine with fish' to an entirely new level, based on insights learned from their previous books on cuisine, as well as interviews with America’s top, cutting-edge sommeliers. In many ways, the format of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT resembles a substantial wine/food pairing encyclopedia specifically designed to be quickly skimmed before heading off to a restaurant or purchasing wine for a dinner party. For example, let’s say you are entertaining clients at a steakhouse, and want to sound intelligent about wine. You know red wine typically goes with red meat, but which red? Old world or new? And what are the virtues of each? By spending just five minutes with this book (and perhaps jotting down some notes) you will be able to help your guests order a Shiraz, Barbaresco, Barolo, or good old Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon based on the elements of the sauce and cut of meat they choose. In a similar fashion, let’s say you want to dazzle your friends and show off your new kitchen with a fabulous dinner party. Spend a few moments with this book and you will be able to pair every element of your menu with an exciting, unusual wine. No need to consult a professional wine expert, as you have this knowledge at your fingertips. Sommeliers interviewed for this book are mostly young and more free-thinking than sommeliers of years past. They are enthusiastic about wine, regardless of whether it’s an exciting, new world find of exceptional value, or a fine-aged Bordeaux worth hundreds of dollars. As a group, they see their mission as helping you find a good wine to accessorize your meal within your price range. And the individual quotes from sommeliers are what makes this book so fresh and appealing. If you entertain or dine out frequently, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT is a dynamic desktop resource and wine and food pairing primer that will stimulate you to learn more about wine by further reading or classes....Yet what works best about this book is the way you can take advantage of the authors’ extensive research and with just a few minutes of skimming, come across as a credible wine expert in front of clients, colleagues, family and friends."
Marisa D'Vari, certified wine educator, BlogCritics magazine (April 6, 2007) and The Juice (April 10, 2007)

"How did Aldo Sohm earn his reputation as America’s best sommelier? Part of his winning strategy has been to use MindManager to create maps that 'help him visualize the links among wines, regions, soils and more,' as recently told to Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg of the Washington Post. Sohm has won awards as a top sommelier in Austria several times since 2002 and was voted the best sommelier this year by the American Sommelier Association. He will join 46 wine connoisseurs on the Greek Island of Rhodes next month to take part in the International Association of Sommeliers competition, which involves preparing for blind taste tests, a food/wine pairing segment, and a written test on his knowledge of wines from all over the world. Perhaps it’s MindManager’s ability to capture large amounts of information in one central and organized interface that makes it an idea application for Sohm to successfully track the often subtle differences that exist between the tens or hundreds of wines he may try per day of competition. In the full article, he said, 'every time I sample a wine, I scan it for data,” later adding background on the details that he must remember in a short period of time, that set each wine apart from one another. During a competition, I’ll have just three minutes to describe a wine’s color, nose and taste; determine its quality level; recommend a food pairing; and come as close as possible to naming its varietal, vintage and region of origin.' Mindjet wishes Sohm the best of luck with the International Association of Sommeliers’ competition! Click here to read the full article on Sohm in the Washington Post."
Gaelen O'Connell, blog.MindJet.com (April 5, 2007)

"Sip by Sip: Tasting His Way to the Top."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post (April 4, 2007), and Ashland Daily Tidings (April 10, 2007) and Recorder News (April 11, 2007)

"Beaujolais has become a wine identified with the fall, notably the third Thursday in November. That's the date the first wine of the just-ended season, the nouveau or primeur, is released with much fanfare around the world. Yet the celebration and the celebrity surrounding simple, naive nouveau obscures a basic fact: There are plenty of far more interesting Beaujolais out there. Look for the crus, bottles of Beaujolais named after 10 villages in this region of southern Burgundy. These are the villages in Beaujolais considered to make the highest-quality wines. They are the ideal reds for spring and summer: lively, fresh, fruity perfect for Easter meals....What to serve with a cru Beaujolais? Many choices exist for this food-friendly wine. In their book WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page offer these as top matches: charcuterie (cold cuts), grilled or roast chicken, pork, salads and sausages. Oh, bacon and burgers work, too."
Bill Daley, The Chicago Tribune (April 4, 2007), Belleville News-Democrat (April 10, 2007), and Connecticut Post (April 11, 2007)

"Books by Mensans: Now here's a coffee-table sized book you'll enjoy diving into [WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT], with a rich lasagna and a bottle of Chianti at your side....Think like a sommelier and transform every meal breakfast, lunch and dinner from ordinary to extraordinary. Fifteen hundred entries provide advice that is based on the collective wisdom of award-winning experts at dozens of America's best restaurants, and they cover every beverage from wines and waters to green tea, coffee, and cider, matched up with every food from jambalaya and Kentucky Fried Chicken to to fettucini and French toast. Interspersed among the beverage-food entries are recipes, advice and anecdotes."
Tom Elliott, Mensa Bulletin (April 2007)

"Chef's Corner: Dan Landsberg at Tillman's Roadhouse....My favorite cookbook: CULINARY ARTISTRY by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. It’s great for creativity and food matches when you need some inspiration for specials."
— Christine Wilson, D Magazine (March/April 2007)

"A great reason to pick up the Washington Post: Eat Something Sexy's favorite food writing duo Karen Page & Andrew Dornenburg are now writing a wine column for the political press."
Amy Reiley, LifeOfReiley.com (March 2007)

"The Precarious Balance of Oak and Yolk."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post
(March 28, 2007) and The Bergen Record (April 11, 2007), The Daily Hampshire Gazette (March 31, 2007), The (WA) Daily Herald (April 22, 2007), The Herald (April 8, 2007), The Herald News (April 11, 2007), Knoxville News Sentinel (April 7, 2007), The Record (April 12, 2007), and Recorder News (April 2007)

"It's worth remarking on recent changes at the Washington Post. In perhaps the most significant addition to a major food section since Harold McGee joined the NYT, the Post has recruited Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg (Becoming a Chef, Culinary Artistry, etc.) for a lively new wine column. With their new book [WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT] hot off the presses, it's a particularly astute move."
"All the Swirl," Weekly Wine Digest (March 23, 2007)

"Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg have impressive credentials in the food world. The couple are the authors of four books that have either been nominated for or won James Beard and IACP awards. They were the first to tackle a reference book on culinary composition and flavor compatibility. Dornenburg is a former restaurant chef, and both hold certificates as sommeliers. But even the pros can learn a thing or two, and in researching their newest book, they were smart enough to seek out experts to round out their expertise in wine or boost their knowledge of other beverages....WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT is a reference on pairing foods and beverages. Unlike the myriad books and guides that teach the tenets of pairing wine with food, the 356-page volume goes beyond wine to include spirits, beer, sake, tea, coffee and even bottled waters. At its most basic, the book is divided into two parts: a list of foods, from anise to zucchini, and the beverages that complement them, and a list of drinks matched to specific foods or food groups...."
Linda Giuca, The Hartford Courant and Knight-Ridder/Tribune Business News (March 22, 2007)

"There are many too many cooking books and web sites that offer very good suggestions when cooking at home. A good plan is to pick a few well-known books and stick close to them. The All New All Purpose Joy of Cooking (1997) is a good source. (Reviews for the most recent 75th Anniversary Edition published in 2006 are fair I'd go with the 1997 version.) A few other suggestions include Cooking School Secrets for Real World Cooks by Linda Carucci and CULINARY ARTISTRY by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, and the magazine Cook's Illustrated."
Katharine Kelly, Urban Tulsa Weekly (March 21, 2007)

"Today marks the debut of The Washington Post 's newly redesigned Food and Dining section with a weekly column from James Beard Award-winning authors Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. Dorenburg and Page are the authors of several modern classics on food and chefs: BECOMING A CHEF, DINING OUT, THE NEW AMERICAN CHEF, and most recently WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. I've loved reading every one of Dornenburg and Page's books and often refer to them for ideas for new recipes. I look forward to reading their weekly column. Although I think of these writers as food experts, their last book WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT shows they are definitely into wine. Their down-to-earth and enthusiastic approach to wine will certainly make for some interesting (and most useful) reading."
Brett Moore, GourmetFood.About.com (March 21, 2007)

"Tidbits: Seafood market Wild Edibles has opened a restaurant as part of their space at 535 Third Avenue at 36th Street. Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page stopped by to check it out."
Laren Spirer, Gothamist (March 21, 2007)

"Four Pours That Are Verifiably Vernal."
Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, The Washington Post
(March 21, 2007), The Arizona Republic, The Journal Star and The Recorder News (March 21-28, 2007)

"Today's Food section features new content and a spiced-up design, including recipes made easier to read and clip. In this month's Chef on Call, the preeminent Michel Richard responds to two girls' request for help concocting a surprise party for their father, and goes to their Potomac kitchen for a tutorial they won't soon forget. Among the new columns: Food critic Tom Sietsema gives his first impressions of the just-opened Oyamel; wine writers Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg help match what's in your glass with what's on your plate this spring...."
The Washington Post, page A1 (March 21, 2007)

"A New Food Section: We added content, designed a new look and reorganized to help you better interact with what interests you most in Food. Here's some of what's new today: Wine: Our new beverages page features the debut column by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, award-winning authors who bring a fresh voice to the topic by focusing on how best to enjoy wine: with food."
"Food" section, The Washington Post (March 21, 2007)

"Film actors and directors have the Oscars. Washington area chefs and restaurant owners anxiously wait each year for the results of the nationally recognized James Beard Foundation Awards and the local Rammy awards by the Restaurant Association Metropolitan Washington. The 2007 nominations are in....Richard's book is also a finalist for a 2007 cookbook award from the International Association of Culinary Professionals. Other IACP finalists include WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, The Post's new wine columnists."
Walter Nicholls, The Washington Post (March 21, 2007)

"In their book WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page devote many pages to pairing foods to beverages and vice versa. With corned beef, the quintessential St. Patrick's Day food here in the U.S., the pair suggest Alsatian pinot gris, Alsatian pinot blanc, off-dry riesling and even Champagne. Their top choices, though, are beerof course and red wine. Beaujolais to be exact."
Bill Daley, The Chicago Tribune (March 14, 2007)

"The writing team of Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg have made their mark with books that bring us inside the craft and life of America's chefs and their restaurants. Now, they've taken a new tack: looking at how we eat and drink, and what tastes best with what. They've gathered wisdom from the people who live and breathe these questions: expert chefs and sommeliers. The resulting book is an encyclopedia that embraces everything from apples to veggie burgers, from wine to coffee. It's called WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT."
Lynne Rossetto Kasper, "The Splendid Table," Minnesota Public Radio (March 10, 2007)

"The Evolution of American Cuisine....America's culinary evolution and our nation's place in the universe of food today seemed an almost overwhelming topic for only one voice to address. There are so many facets, aspects, angles and perspectives to consider that we decided to ask a number of international culinary luminaries [Patrick O'Connell, Andre Soltner, Alan Richman, Gael Greene, Colman Andrews, Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, Barbara Fairchild, Alice Waters, Nina & Tim Zagat, and Phyllis Richman] to share their thoughts on the subject. We received a veritable buffet of wisdom from a diverse spectrum of chefs, restaurateurs, journalists, and food critics who approached the assignment from singularly unique points of view. Not surprisingly, they all agree on one thing: We've come a long way, baby...."
L'Ame & L'Esprit magazine, published by Relais & Chateaux (Winter 2007)

"Kitchen Aids: Gadgets, gizmos, and more! The food experts share their healthy cooking must-haves....To help you find your next five-star buy, we turned to those who know: nutritionists, cooking instructors, food writers, and even celebrity chefs. Here, their picks for the essential kitchen toys to make cooking easier, tastier, healthier, and of course more fun....5) Find In-Season Eats. CULINARY ARTISTRY ($30; www.amazon.com). 'This is the best reference book I've used. It has an extensive chart that shows exactly when fruits, vegetables, and meats are at their peak. Sticking to the seasons ensures that food is at its best flavor, price, and, most important, nutritional value.' Scott Giambastiani, executive chef at Cafe-7 and Cafe Moma, serving organic meals to thousands of employees at Google in Mountain View, CA."
Heather Lee, Prevention magazine (March 2007)

"Want to know what it is like to live in the Murray Hill section of Manhattan — that strip between Madison and Third avenues that runs roughly between 29th and 38th streets? You could ask someone who lives there, but be forewarned: the answer you get will depend on who you talk to. One resident may name-drop celebrities often seen in the area restaurants — familiar faces from the nearby Court TV studios, CNN's Anderson Cooper, gossip columnist Liz Smith, top chef Rocco DiSpirito, or pop singer Nick Lachey's latest squeeze, Vanessa Minnillo. Another may talk about how Murray Hill is now a happening hangout for the young post-college crowd, and yet another may talk about the appeal of the striking pre-war building architecture and the quiet feel of the neighborhood. One common concurrence runs through all of these diversified answers: those who live here are very fond and fiercely loyal to their neighborhood. Award-winning culinary authors Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page relocated from Boston to Murray Hill in March of 1992. Back then, they say, it was a quiet neighborhood, but Dornenburg and Page have enjoyed witnessing the area's total transformation over the ensuing years, including the addition of two W Hotels and the renovation of nearby Grand Central Terminal. Even their own apartment building has undergone a residential demographic makeover — today, their neighbors tend to be younger professional couples, rather than the older longtime residents who occupied it when they arrived. 'It's fun to make discoveries,' says Dornenburg. 'One of our favorite things about living here is just running errands because of the architecture and views. One of my favorite walks is down Lexington between 36th and 37th Streets, where you get this great view of the Empire State Building and old brownstones.' The couple also love the restaurants that have opened — a true delight to the professional epicures. 'I always complained that we had to leave the area to eat — but that's not the case anymore,' says Page. 'A great Moroccan restaurant just opened, and it's phenomenal. It's nice to have that variety in the neighborhood.'"
Lisa Iannucci, The Cooperator (March 2007)

"CELEBRITY, PART 1. Want fries with that fame? According to AOL: By some estimates, up to 10 percent of the American workforce first worked at McDonald's. Here are some of the famous folks who did time there: Sharon Stone, Andrew Card (former Bush chief of staff), Jay Leno, Pink, Jeff Bezos (Amazon.com founder), Carl Lewis, Macy Gray, Rachel McAdams, Andrew Dornenburg (chef, author)..."
Florida Times-Union (February 22, 2007)

"No coupling too unusual for pairing food and drink: If you're still struggling with how to pair reds and whites, you've got a steep learning curve ahead of you. That's because the art of pairing food and drink has taken a turn to the avant-garde, making your worries over which wine best complements your entree seem positively pedestrian. Today, the question isn't whether shellfish takes chardonnay or shiraz, but which single-source gourmet dark chocolate best marries a porter. Or whether Italian roast coffee shines with cave-aged Gruyere or fresh ricotta. Consider this urge to pair unlikely items a symptom of the broadening of the nation's palate. Led by chic restaurateurs and audacious gourmets, Americans searching for the next taste sensation are increasingly open to new ways of thinking about old flavors. Such as the partnering of scotch and sushi at San Francisco's Nihon restaurant. Or the pairing of riesling and steak tartar at New York's Riingo restaurant. Even coffee and cheese, classes on which are offered by Murray's Cheese shop in New York. It's an extension of Americans' almost obsessive interest in the provenance of their food, says Dana Cowin, editor-in-chief of Food & Wine magazine. 'As people understand the individual nuances of things, then the next question in their mind is how do they go together.' ... Taste is so relative, many foodies are reluctant to say which combinations work and which don't. If you like it, it works. But there are some guidelines that can improve your odds of liking a pairing. Karen Page, co-author of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT encourages people to think regionally because foods and drinks with common backgrounds often have complimentary flavors. Cheddar cheese and hard cider, for example, match well. Both are products of England. Page also encourages people to generalize about the heft of the food. Hearty food, hearty drink and lighter food lighter drink (so stout might be a better complement to a roast beef sandwich than to a leafy salad)."
J.M. Hirsch, The Associated Press, in America Online, Berkshire Eagle (MA), Canton (OH) Repository, The Daily Breeze (Torrance, CA), The Hartford Courant, Helena Independent, Kane County (IL) Chronicle, The Lawrence (KS) Journal-World, The Lubbock (TX) Avalanche-Journal, Northwest Herald (Crystal Lake, IL), The Record-Journal (CT), The Seattle Times, Sioux City Weekender, The St. Paul Pioneer Press, The Tahoe Daily Tribune, The Telegraph-Herald (IA), The Times of Northwest Indiana, The Tuscaloosa News, and The Victoria (CT) Advocate (February 21-28, 2007)

"IMAGINE having the perfect wine for every dish on the takeout menu from your favorite Chinese seafood restaurant. The very notion seems farfetched. Those menus usually list dozens of items running the gamut from heat to savory, sweet to sour. Where do you start? I'd recommend you start by picking up the latest book from food writers Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bulfinch Press, $35) and turn to the page in the fifth chapter on Chinese food, where you'll find 20 well-reasoned suggestions, as well as a handful to avoid. Most of them will make the meal better. A few might be ideal. And one might create that perfect synergy between food and drink that can make even eating out of a box a memorable dining experience. Pairing wine with food has always been more of an art than a science. Even though hundreds of thousands of words annually are devoted to the topic in books, newspapers, magazines and blogs, it's nearly impossible to apply hard and fast rules. And really, how could you? The perfect pairing is almost always inexpressible, a heady mix of the sensual and the unexpected. When it happens, words fail; you're left speechless, simply marveling at your own mouth. So a book that seeks to demystify this most wondrous of mysteries seems about as useful as a book on how to look at a painting, or a book on how to read a book. But that is exactly what the husband-wife team Dornenburg and Page have done with WHAT TO DRINK, subtitled 'The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea — Even Water — Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers.' Thanks to Dornenburg's experience as a chef and the pair's seemingly insatiable appetites and exhaustive taxonomic energies, the authors have shed new light on the art of pairing, ensuring even the novice wine drinker — and eater — a book's worth of peak experiences. Dornenburg and Page are best known for their book BECOMING A CHEF, a kind of experiential guidebook: life lessons by way of the toque. But the new book builds on their more recent CULINARY ARTISTRY, to which a number of the country's most famous chefs contributed their expertise on complementary foods. At the heart of that book is an index of ingredients and their most reliable and delicious accompaniments. This approach, supplemented by chef's suggestions and recipes, allows readers to reference time-honored flavor combinations with flashcard quickness....Clearly Dornenburg's experience as a chef plays into this. If anyone can articulate the flavor nuances between a Kumamoto and a Wellfleet oyster, or for that matter between a skirt steak and a rib eye, it's a chef. When the authors delve into their topic on this level of detail, the results can be thrilling. In fact the cheese guide, with more than 100 different cheeses and their accompanying wines, may alone be worth the price of the book...[F]ew books of its kind are more enjoyable. The final chapter invites sommeliers to select their 'desert island' wines, and the results are a wonderful. Indeed, if your island retreat comes equipped with a good refrigerator, a Wolf stove and a set of Calphalon, make sure you pack WHAT TO DRINK too, and you'll happily live out your days."
Patrick Comiskey, Los Angeles Times (February 21, 2007)

GlobalChefs

"Welcome to the first GlobalChefs & ChefTalk newsletter of 2007. So far it has been a great year for us and we kicked things off with an open forum with Andrew Dorenburg and Karen Page. If you missed the forum be sure to check it out in our archives here (open forum)."
Jeremy Emmerson and Nicko Sahlas, Global Chefs and Chef Talk newsletter (February 2007)

"Wine and Beer Dinners/Happenings As part of its Food & Wine Paring Dinner Series, Metro Bis Restaurant (928 Hopmeadow St., Simsbury) features authors Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page February 22 at 6:30 p.m. who will highlight their book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. Chef-owner Chris Prosperi prepares a five-course dinner paired with wines from the Pacific Northwest. A copy of the featured cookbook is included with the price of the meal."
The Record-Journal (Meridien, CT) (February 16, 2007)

"Plusieurs stars ont travaillé chez McDonald's: Selon le site American Online, 10% de la population américaine aurait, un jour ou l'autre dans sa vie, travaillé chez McDonald's. C'est dire le nombre de gens qui en ont flippé, des cheeses...AOL s'est amusé à dresser la liste des plus célèbres employés de la chaîne. Les voici, livrés à la manière de la restauration rapide: Shania Twain, Sharon Stone, Andrew Card, Jay Leno, Pink, Jeff Bezos, Carl Lewis, Macy Gray, Rachel McAdams, Andrew Dornenburg, D.L. Hughley et...Barbie, qui a enfilé le costume d'employée en 2001 afin d'amasser des sous pour les oeuvre caritatives de McDonald's. Un chausson avec ça?"
Cyberpresse.ca (February 16, 2007)

kjendis.no

"(Dagbladet.no): Poprebellen Pink var ofte på en syretripp da hun arbeidet for McDonalds i ungdomsårene. Da foretrakk hun å sitte dovakt i timesvis og stirre på flisene. Nå har nettstedet America Online satt opp en liste over konsernets mest kjente ansatte.
Blant de som flippet burgere for kjeden finner man skuespillerne Sharon Stone og Rachel McAdams, artisten Macy Gray, talkshow-verten Jay Leno, og Amazon.com-grunnlegger og Time Magazine's Man of the Year 1999, Jeff Bezos. Andrew Card, George W. Bushs tidligere stabssjef, jobbet på «Mickey D» i to omganger. Først da han gikk på ungdomsskolen, senere for å forsørge familien mens han fikk seg en universitetsutdannelse. 
Kjendisene har tatt med seg viktig lærdom fra tida hos fastfood-giganten. Der lærte jeg hva service er, sier countrystjerna Shania Twain. Den pensjonerte sprinteren Carl Lewis stilte nylig opp i en reklame for å lovprise lederevnene han plukket opp som ansatt.
Andrew Dornenburg, kjent amerikansk kokk og matskribent, er likevel den som har fått mest ut av jobben...."
Birgitte Mandelid, Kjendis.no (February 15, 2007)

"WHO Flipped Burgers at McDonald's? If you currently work at McDonald's or previously worked there, you are in good company. According to AOL's Business & Finance Channel, Mickey D's has been an employer for several high-profile celebrities, including Shania Twain, Sharon Stone, Jay Leno and Pink. Others include Andrew Card, President Bush's first chief of staff, Olympian Carl Lewis, Amazon.com founder and TIME's Man of the Year in 1999 Jeff Bezos, singer Macy Gray, actress Rachel McAdams, chef Andrew Dornenburg and comedian D.L. Hughley, who stars in "Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip." By some estimates, up to 10 percent of the American work force first worked at McDonald's, reports AOL. Some fun quotes about their tenure flipping burgers at McDonald's:
Shania Twain: "I learned tons about the meaning of service there."
Pink: "I would open (the restaurant), because I'd be tripping on acid...and I would say, 'Could I have bathroom duty?' And I would sit in the bathroom and watch the tiles."
Jeff Bezos: "One of the great gifts I got from that job is I can crack eggs with one hand."
Chef Andrew Dornenburg: "Having my first job at McDonald's definitely taught me how to get organized in the kitchen, and to work fast and as part of a team. It taught me the importance of a clean kitchen and good work habits."
By some estimates, up to 10 percent of the American work force first worked at McDonald's."
CompuServe.com, Netscape.com (February 15, 2007)

"America Online says that 10 percent of the U.S. population has at one time or another worked flipping burgers at McDonald's and some of them are Shania Twain, Sharon Stone, Jay Leno, Jeff Bezos, the food writer Andrew Dornenburg, Pink...and Kelly Ripa...."
Regis Philbin, "Live with Regis and Kelly" (February 15, 2007)

"Burger benefits. About 10 percent of the U.S. population has flipped burgers for McDonald's, according to America Online, which spotlighted 10 of McDonald's 'Most Famous Former Employees' including Shania Twain, Sharon Stone, Jay Leno, Amazon.com's Jeff Bezos, and food writer Andrew Dornenburg. Fellow McDonald's alum Pink recalled, 'I would open the restaurant because I'd be tripping on acid...and I would say, 'Could I have bathroom duty?' And I would sit in the bathroom and watch the tiles.'"
Richard Johnson, "Page Six," New York Post
(February 15, 2007)

"As a child I grew up spending many a Sunday afternoon at the Downtown library gathering up books to read later in the week. I eventually worked at my college library to help pay my tuition. Later, rather than part with any of the precious books I'd accumulated through the years, I spent a small fortune moving my personal library from Milwaukee to Manhattan and back again. In short, I adore books, especially those relating to art, design, lifestyle and home. One of my current favorites is WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page from Bulfinch Press. It's a wonderful definitive guide to pairing food and beverages, whether wine, beer, cocktails, water, juice, coffee or tea. If you've got a passion for food or even a passing interest in decent dining, pick up a copy for yourself; I promise you won't be disappointed in this treasure trove of information. Plus it makes a perfect hostess gift! Available at all Harry W. Schwartz Bookshops all locations. "
Colleen Heather Rogan, Milwaukee magazine (February 15, 2007)

"WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT [is] a great, great book....A great resource...A must-have....A super read."
Mike Colameco, "Food Talk," WOR Radio (February 11, 2007)

"Metro Bis, 928 Hopmeadow St., Simsbury, will host a five-course Pacific Northwest wine dinner with authors Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page on Feb. 22 beginning at 6:30 p.m. Price is $85 a person or $160 a couple and will include a signed copy of their book WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. Reservations can be made by calling 860-651-1908."
MaryEllen Fillo, Hartford Courant (February 8, 2007)

"THE world of caffeine got a jolt last week when Consumer Reports tested Starbucks coffee against fast-food chains' lowly joe and the winner was ... McDonald's...For a real kick, New Yorkers know you can't rely on a burger chain. So with the help of local connoisseurs and experts, we went trolling for the truly best coffee in town one with smooth, rich coffee flavor and no bitterness or burnt taste, a cup you can really wake up and smell. Andrew Dornenburg, co-author with Karen Page of the much-praised WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT confesses to being a 'recovering coffee-holic' who is 'down to three large cups a day.' And if he's lucky, they come from Amy's Bread, which serves full-bodied, low-acid brews, he says. Dornenburg admits to occasionally hitting McDonald's for a quick fix "it's pretty good," he says but you'll never catch him on line at a cart or a big chain, where coffee often has a burnt or metallic taste from being brewed too hot, held too long or made in metal pots...BEST BREW #1) Amy's Bread. Amy Scherber's blend 'is full-bodied with not too much acid,' says food author Andrew Dornenburg. 'It stands up to the big slug of milk I invariably pour in.' "
Cynthia Kilian, New York Post (February 7, 2007)

"Karen Page, James Beard Award-winning co-author of Becoming a Chef, Culinary Artistry, Dining Out, Chef's Night Out, and The New American Chef tells WCR about her latest book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT, which was published in October by Little, Brown and Company: 'Because food and drink are consumed simultaneously, a beverage is like the final 'sauce' that finishes a dish. The next frontier for professional chefs is taking control of how customers experience your dishes, which means taking control of what they drink whenever possible. We suspect that many of those instances when a diner complains that a dish tastes 'off' and the kitchen can't find anything wrong are due to mismatched pairings of food and drink. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT lists different foods from A to Z, thesaurus-style, from aioli to zucchini blossoms, and which drinks best complement them. There's also a section that lists different drinks, from ale to Zinfandel, and the foods that provide the best pairings for them. Through more than 1,500 different listings, you'll find matches for more than 17 different cuisines and 100 different cheeses. Don't miss the 'Holy Grail' pairings that every self-respecting food lover should experience at least once in a lifetime!"
Women Chefs and Restaurateurs' ENTREZ!, "Bookshelf" (Winter 2007)

"McDonald's Most Famous Former Employees...The first McDonald's franchise opened in Des Plaines, Ill. in April 1955. Over 50 years later, there are more than 30,000 restaurants in 119 countries serving 47 million people daily. By some estimates, up to 10 percent of the American work force first worked at McDonald's. Check out [ten] of Mickey D's most famous alumni in the following photo gallery: Shania Twain, Sharon Stone, former White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card, Jay Leno, Pink, Amazon.com's Jeff Bezos, Olympic athlete Carl Lewis, Macy Gray, Rachel McAdams, and Andrew Dornenburg.... Chef and James Beard Award-winning author of culinary books, including THE NEW AMERICAN CHEF, worked at McDonald's in the mid-1970's. He notes: 'Having my first job at McDonald's definitely taught me how to get organized in the kitchen, and to work fast and as part of a team. It taught me the importance of a clean kitchen and good work habits.'"
America Online's Money & Finance Channel (February 5, 2007)

"A Good Match: A pair of award-winning culinary writers made it their mission to create a comprehensive guide to matching food and drink. Ever wonder what kind of sandwich goes really well with a Dr. Brown's Cel Ray soda? Well, culinary authors Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page did and they have the answer (corned beef, if you really want to know) in their in-depth food and beverage pairing book WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea Even Water Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers. Chock full of more than 10,000 suggested pairings, based on recommendations by more than 70 culinary experts, the book guides readers on what to drink with everything from doughnuts to lobster. Beverage World chatted with the New York City authors, who have been married for 16 years, about making a good match...."
Heather Landi, Beverage World (January 2007)

"When I was first getting into wine, I picked up every wine-related book I can find. And now, I review them occasionally in my writing. So, when a friend of mine recently asked me to recommend a few, I knew exactly the three to suggest....For most people — including myself — wine is best enjoyed with food rather than by itself in a vacuum. But matching wine with food intimidates a lot of people. If you struggle with figuring out what wine to pour with dinner pick up a copy of WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea — Even Water— Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. It's the type of reference that anybody who enjoys cooking, wine and entertaining should have in their kitchen. Along with some basic pairing guidelines, it features an extensive list of foods with pairing suggestions. So say you're serving curry chicken. You turn to that page and you'll see that chardonnay is the most suggested pairing, but that beer, sparkling wine and gewürztraminer are other options. To give you an idea of just how extensive the food list is, they even list White Castle Hamburgers — and suggest riesling, rose or white zinfandel. The book also allows you to start with the wine first and find suitable foods, something I've not seen before. As someone who often starts menu planning with the wines I want to serve, this is a great feature."
Lenn Thompson, Hamptons.com (January 31, 2007)

"THE sight of 400 well-heeled women spilling into the Time-Life Building the other night at 6 p.m. turned heads as Time Inc. Chairwoman and CEO Ann Moore [photo above] hosted the largest gathering of Harvard Business School alumnae in history. After a cocktail reception, Moore welcomed her fellow graduates, including Corcoran Group SVP Sharon Baum, arts philanthropist Stephanie French, Staples co-founder Myra Hart, author Karen Page, Dow Jones Ventures President Ann Sarnoff and Estée Lauder Vice Chairwoman Emeritus Jeanette Wagner, with some career advice: 'It's good for women to get together for a stiff drink'."
Richard Johnson, "Page Six," New York Post
(January 27, 2007)

"WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. At last, a book for those of us who don't want to wade through an entire book to figure out what to do with that gift bottle or what to bring to dinner when put in charge of the drinks. In addition to giving two ways to look things up (one is to look by drink available, the other by food served), and being full of helpful hints on choosing glassware, this handsome book contains lots of general information about regional wine specialties and anecdotes by sommeliers. This is not limited to wine, however, or even to alcoholic beverages, but also includes coffees, teas, waters, and juices. Mouth-watering reading!"
Kathy Ward, Juneau Empire (January 26, 2007)

"Cooking Bestsellers: "Hot List"...#5) WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg, Karen Page and Michael Sofronski (Bulfinch, $35). Subtitled 'The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food With Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea — Even Water — Based on Expert Advice From America's Best Sommeliers.'...Rankings are based on a Times poll of national and independent booksellers."
Los Angeles Times

"Here's Collen Heather Rogan's weekly list of hot shopping; catch her work in the pages of Milwaukee magazine: A GREAT BOOK TO OWN (and perfect hostess gift): WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea — Even Water — Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. Publisher's suggested price: $35.
At your local or internet bookstore."
WKTI 94.5 FM / Milwaukee

"Food and wine pairings have long bedeviled diners looking for a heavenly match. But they should relax and realize most dishes can pair with a number of different wines. Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page tackle the conundrum in their new book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bulfinch, $35). So thorough is the guide that a reader can look up food choices by wine type and wines by various flavors or dishes, ranging from a bowl of Doritos to eel, veal and wasabi."
Bill Daley, Orlando Sentinel

the strong buzz

"...I happened upon Darna with my friends Karen and Andrew, prolific culinarians and authors whose opinions on matters of food I trust implicitly. We settled in on a frigid night last week and were quickly welcomed by Mourad (in a great dark suit) and seated at a cozy pillowed banquette opposite a dark-wooded bar lit from above by Moroccan lanterns. With Darna, Mourad has created an oasis-like ode to his native land. The restaurant is a small and simple stage, but it is also beautiful, with walls washed in soft dappled shades of orange and sienna. The room is lit with a twinkling almost magical glow from a series of old authentic imported Moroccan lanterns that leave walls dancing with light. Tables are heavy solid dark wood matched with curved plush armchairs. While we caught up on the past few months (Karen and Andrew were on a book tour promoting their latest book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT), we swiped slices of dense wheat bread through bowls of bracing tapenade, and popped olives the size of small plums into our mouths...."
Andrea Strong, TheStrongBuzz.com

"Fabulous Foods' Top Ten Book Picks of 2006. As the editor of FabulousFoods.com, countless food, wine and cookbooks come across my desk each year. Most have some merit, others make you wonder what the publishers were drinking when they decided to print them. A few are outstanding. As always, it was tough to narrow down the field to just ten. In making our selections, we tried to choose a variety of topics, as well as an overall list that would have something for cooks at every end of the spectrum. With the exception of choice number 1, our favorite foodie book of 2006, the list is in no particular order....#1) WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. Two of my favorite food writers have done it again with a fabulous new book that should be in the library of anyone who loves food and wine. When I think about the research that Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page put into this massive reference, my head begins to spin. The result of the James Beard award winning team's efforts is an encyclopedic reference that will help you perfectly match all your meals with the perfect beverage or vice versa. Over 70 top wine experts contributed their advice and expertise to this book to create a wide-ranging food and beverage pairing reference covering more than 1500 categories, including 17 cuisines and 100 cheeses. Serious oenophiles will undoubtedly pour through the pages meticulously digesting each tidbit and nugget of invaluable advice from America's top sommeliers. You can seriously advance your wine education by carefully reading this book. But even folks who are merely casually interested in wine will benefit from this book, as they can simply look up a food (arranged alphabetically) and get quick tips on what to serve with it. Not sure what you want to serve but have a great wine? No problem, another chapter matches wines with foods. In either direction, finding the perfect match is as easy as looking up a word in a dictionary."

from house to HOME

"Champagne: It's not just for New Year's Eve....For pairings specialists Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, every event, every day, every meal is a celebration and what better way to celebrate than to drink Champagne? Karen says, 'Bubbles seem to be equated with celebration, and once you open up the bubbles, you can turn any meal into a special occasion. Take a tip from these experts, and try this heady drink for any occasion..."

TravelLady Magazine

"WHAT TO PAIR WITH ROSÉ? According to WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT authors Andrew Dornenberg and Karen Page (published by Bulfinch Press), the idea behind wine pairing should always be synergy: 'The food makes the wine taste better, and the wine makes the food taste better.' Whether you decide to stay in or go out, here are a few key items to remember for easy pairing with your pink bubbly this year."

gluten-free girl

"Most of my best food experiences come from random happenstance, it seems. Yesterday, while I was buying my daily venti drip coffee for the Chef at the beginning of his shift, I talked to my favorite barista about her lunch. (We talk every day, and we have become friends. It wasn't as weird as it seems.) She exulted about the jicama she ate, along with fresh fruit. Jicama.... My brain caught upon it, the idea of that crisp, delicious white tuber, cut into strips. By the time I had walked back to the Chef's restaurant, I had an idea. Together, we perused his copy of CULINARY ARTISTRY, his favorite book besides mine. Jicama goes well with chiles and lime? Hm. When I left the door, I had a new recipe in mind. Time to go to the store. This is how we ate my new favorite dish for dinner last night: chilled millet with roasted jalapenos, mangoes, lime segments, and slivered jicama...."

"Plenty of information and humor go into best wine books of 2006....Herewith my annual mini-reviews of the most fascinating wine books of 2006: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page (Bulfinch, $35). This takes some novel approaches to wine-food pairing. One is to pair light and heavy foods to light and heavy wines. And it gives you a list of wines from the lightest to the heaviest (chablis to viognier in whites, beaujolais to zinfandel in reds). I've tried this method, and I like it. It also gives some unusual pairings (cucumbers with riesling, rose champagne with cumin). It'll get you arguing with your foodie friends."

"Citrus fruits and flavors are increasingly on the plate as Americans experiment with dishes inspired by Asian, Latino and Mediterranean kitchens. But an age-old question remains: What to drink with these oft-colorful and sassy ingredients?... Food and wine pairings have long bedeviled diners looking for a heavenly match. But they should relax and realize most dishes can pair with a number of different wines. Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page tackle the conundrum in their new book, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bulfinch, $35). So thorough is the guide that a reader can look up food choices by wine type and wines by various flavors or dishes, ranging from a bowl of Doritos to eel, veal and wasabi. Citrus, in general, works fine with chardonnay, riesling (especially German beerenauslese with citrus desserts), sauvignon blanc (especially New Zealand), according to Dornenburg and Page. Here are some of their suggestions for wines to pour with specific citrus fruits:
- Grapefruit: Champagne, ice wine (especially with desserts), orange muscat (especially with grapefruit desserts), Pouilly-Fume.
- Lemon: Sauvignon blanc. With sweet desserts, Asti, Alsatian or late harvest gewurztraminer, ice wine, Madeira, moscato d'Asti, muscat (especially California and/or white or orange), muscat de Beaumes-de-Venise.
- Lime: Riesling, sauvignon blanc (especially high-acid), Australian verdelho. With seafood and lime, chenin blanc (especially California), Oregon pinot gris, Vouvray. With sweet lime desserts, ice wine, riesling (especially late harvest or other sweet).
- Orange: Savory dishes, German riesling, semillon, sherry. Desserts, Champagne, muscat (especially orange or Beaumes-de-Venise), Sauternes."
, The Baltimore Sun (January 28, 2007), Belleville News-Democrat (January 23, 2007), The Idaho Statesman (February 7, 2007), The Orlando Sentinel (January 24, 2007), and The Victoria (TX) Advocate (January 24, 2007)

Water into Wino

"Required Reading: WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page. Finding wine recommendations and reviews online is a breeze these days, and in my opinion, blogs are primary destinations for such info. Specific wine pairings are another story. This book covers a huge amount of territory and looks into which drink might pair well with a wide range of foods. It doesn't limit itself to wine either as spirits and specific brands of beer are covered as well. One of my favorite features includes actual tasting menus from restaurants around the world and several explanations from well respected sommeliers. It even differentiates between what goes well with Domino's Pizza (which is sweeter than most) and regular pizza. Gonna have pepperoni? Try a Montepulciano. Sausage? Try a zinfandel. Any my favorite pairing...a Cabernet Franc with a peppers and onion pizza. Obviously these are just the most basic of examples as this book goes into great detail. Unless you are already an expert, I highly recommend this book."
waterintowino.typepad.com

"....WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT (Bullfinch, $35) by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page offers very specific, well-thought out recommendations about what tastes best with what. But use it as a general guide, not the law."

"Foodie heaven in '07. Experts reveal the newest taste trends: CALL IT THE year of the foodie. This year is expected to prove that now, more than ever before, food-savvy Americans are dining out, savoring wines and spirits, cooking at home and generally considering themselves experts in all things gastronomical. Overall, we're expected to fork out $1.3 trillion to eat and drink out and at home in 2007. And while some of last year's hot trends from steakhouses to citrus-infused vodkas seem to be here to stay, the industry is plotting some dramatic changes in 2007, from menu innovations to cooking techniques to new wines and foods. So what should you look for this year? We talked with husband-wife team Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, authors, sommeliers and industry watchers, to find out what's hot. The duo just published their seventh food tome, WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food with Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea — Even Water — Based on Expert Advice from America's Best Sommeliers. They predicted a tasty year...."

"As fans of Pizzeria Uno know, transferring a beloved Chicago food institution isn't easy....Garrett's, said noted food writers Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, stumbled in the critical early going in New York (where Dale & Thomas Popcorn does very well) by not offering consistently hot and fresh popcorn. 'We wondered whether it was popped in Chicago and simply FedExed,' they wrote, adding the cheese popcorn wasn't as cheesey or salty as it is here. Could there be a plot afoot to keep Garrett's from further expansion? A Chicago conspiracy to monopolize these delectable treats? New York may be the Big Apple, but when it comes to specialty popcorn, we're the Big Cheese."
Chicago Sun-Times, "Commentary" page

Food Notebook

"A little confession: I was going to review WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT: The Definitive Guide to Pairing Food With Wine, Beer, Spirits, Coffee, Tea Even Water Based on Expert Advice From America's Best Sommeliers before the holiday season so that readers would know this is a great present to give. Then it occurred to me that I wanted to give this book to a bunch of friends so I couldn't blog about it; otherwise, they might get it for me! So if you are in the mood to get yourself a little treat now that the holidays are over, this is the one. Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page do an incredible job of matching up ingredients and drinks (not just wines). All my friends that received a copy love it and have been quoting to me."
Carter Lusher, FoodNotebook.com

"2006 was a great year for food & wine books. WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT by Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page is probably the most useful food & wine book of 2006."
Joanne White, Slashfood.com

"Celebrated Food Writers Visit Bellingham Restaurant: James Beard Award-winning authors Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page visited Nimbus Restaurant in downtown Bellingham during their recent book tour with their latest release WHAT TO DRINK WITH WHAT YOU EAT. The New York-based food writers gave Nimbus rave reviews on their popular blog....'It was an honor to host two people who are so passionate about food,' said Winberg. Silverman added, 'It was exciting to receive feedback from people who have dined at some of the best restaurants in the world.'"
Entertainment News NW

"Who knew there were so many Harvard folks in the food writing world? Check out these books from Harvard and non-Harvard writers alike....Becoming a Chef, Culinary Artistry, The New American Chef, and What to Drink with What You Eat — Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, MBA '89."

"It's easy to stress out when throwing a dinner party, but what's the worst that can happen?.... 'Remember, it's all about connecting with your guests — and everything else is secondary,' according to Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, the James Beard Award-winning authors of five best-selling culinary books. 'If you're so worried and stressed about impressing people with the perfect home or the perfect souffle, it's likely that no one's going to have fun. Plan ahead. Choose do-ahead desserts and a slow-cooked entree, so all you have to do at the last minute is buy bread and make a salad. Use the 48 to 72 hours before the party wisely, so you don't have to stress out at the last minute."

See Media Room - 2006

Andrew Dornenburg and/or Karen Page have been featured extensively on local and national television, including such shows as:

“Today Show,” NBC-TV (national)
“America 's Talking,” CNBC-TV (national)
“At the Chef's Table” (PBS, nationally)
CNN Headline News (national)
“Connie Martinson Talks Books” (national)
“Pure Oxygen,” Oxygen TV (national)
TV Guide Channel (national)
“7 News at 11:00 AM ,” KMGH-TV (Denver, CO)
“11:00 AM News,” WMAR-TV (Baltimore)
“BCTV News” on Global (British Columbia)
“Channel 30 News,” WVIT-TV (Hartford)
“City Cooks” with Simi Sara, City TV (Vancouver)
“Eyewitness News Weekend,” WJZ-TV (Baltimore)
“Food & Wine Friday,” Channel 10 News (Palisades Park, NJ)
“Fox Noon News,” WTTG-TV (Washington, DC)
“Fox Thing in the Morning,” WFLD-TV (Chicago)
“Good Day Atlanta ,” WAGA-TV (Atlanta)
“Good Day L.A.,” FOX-TV (Los Angeles)
“Home Matters” on the Discovery Channel
“Morning News,” WLS-TV (Chicago)
“Mornings on 2,” KTVU-TV (San Francisco)
New York 1 News (New York City)
“Phantom Gourmet,” New England Cable (Boston)
“Studio 4 with Fanny Kiefer” (Vancouver)
“The Bookcase,” Media One Cable (Boston)
“Weekend Today” (Chicago)

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Did you know...that nearly half of all adults have worked in the restaurant industry at some point during their lives?


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The New American Chef
[Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page] are the brightest young author team on the culinary scene today.
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